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I never miss an upload from any of these horror YouTube channels (sorted alphabetically):

Bloodbath and Beyond

Cinemassacre

Decker Shado

Doctor Wolfula

Drumdums

Frightfully Forgotten

Off The Shelf Reviews

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The Horror Geek

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Highest grossing horror movies of the 80s:

  Year Title Infl. Adj. Dom.
Box Office
1 1982 Poltergeist $231,487,013
2 1980 The Shining $149,069,991
3 1980 Friday the 13th $134,633,611
4 1989 Pet Sematary $131,214,090
5 1983 Jaws 3-D $122,175,740
6 1982 Friday the 13th Part 3 $113,689,284
7 1988 A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Drea… $109,430,595
8 1981 An American Werewolf in London $104,775,640
9 1987 A Nightmare On Elm Street 3: Dream Wa… $104,364,770
10 1986 Poltergeist II: The Other Side $100,668,361
11 1983 Psycho II $92,546,030
12 1986 The Fly $92,290,923
13 1984 Friday the 13th Part IV: The Final Ch… $89,421,373
14 1983 Twilight Zone: The Movie $85,315,870
15 1981 Halloween II $83,673,765
16 1987 The Lost Boys $75,076,102
17 1988 Child's Play $73,988,742
18 1981 Friday the 13th Part 2 $71,185,066
19 1984 A Nightmare on Elm Street $69,150,621
20 1980 Altered States $67,237,521
21 1981 The Final Conflict $67,083,025
22 1985 Fright Night $63,955,370
23 1982 Creepshow $62,085,087
24 1983 Cujo $61,184,928
25 1983 The Dead Zone $60,056,582
26 1983 Christine $59,959,888
27 1981 The Howling $58,936,453
28 1985 Friday the 13th Part V: A New Beginning $56,277,772
29 1985 A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2: Fre… $54,310,987
30 1981 Ghost Story $52,578,101
31 1989 A Nightmare On Elm Street: The Dream … $50,614,969
32 1986 Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives $47,814,127
33 1986 House $47,746,785
34 1981 Scanners $46,533,087
35 1982 Halloween 3: Season of the Witch $44,620,406
36 1989 The Fly II $44,389,049
37 1987 The Believers $43,694,065
38 1988 The Serpent and the Rainbow $43,433,191
39 1982 The Thing $42,708,044
40 1988 Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood $42,491,163
41 1984 Firestarter $41,040,732
42 1980 The Changeling $40,639,400
43 1982 The Incubus $40,625,863
44 1987 Angel Heart $40,039,725
45 1984 Children of the Corn $39,585,118
46 1984 Night of the Comet $39,585,118
47 1988 Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers $39,385,245
48 1982 Visiting Hours $38,986,190
49 1983 The Entity $38,399,534
50 1989 Shocker $37,797,818
51 1987 Jaws 4: The Revenge $36,645,813
52 1985 The Return of the Living Dead $36,537,204
53 1981 Wolfen $36,046,758
54 1986 Psycho III $35,559,947
55 1982 Amityville II: The Possession $35,101,386
56 1989 Leviathan $35,078,201
57 1981 Happy Birthday To Me $34,767,140
58 1987 Hellraiser $33,933,001
59 1980 Maniac $33,866,170
60 1987 Prince of Darkness $33,042,963
61 1989 Friday the 13th Part VIII: Jason Take… $32,750,277
62 1987 Flowers in the Attic $32,618,920
63 1987 Creepshow 2 $32,618,920
64 1986 Critters $32,332,474
65 1986 April Fool's Day $31,793,563
66 1988 Poltergeist III $31,284,314
67 1987 The Gate $30,289,001
68 1985 Lifeforce $29,776,982
69 1980 The Awakening $28,498,758
70 1985 Silver Bullet $27,723,169
71 1989 Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael M… $26,581,686
72 1988 Hellbound: Hellraiser II $26,017,541
73 1983 The House on Sorority Row $23,670,477
74 1985 Cat's Eye $23,095,772
75 1981 The Funhouse $22,938,843
76 1987 The Hidden $22,712,059
77 1986 Deadly Friend $22,072,054
78 1980 Motel Hell $21,480,187
79 1980 The Fog $21,445,318
80 1988 Return of the Living Dead Part II $20,405,343

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between 1980 and 1989 too hard John Orr
gave us well over 200 slasher flicks
most of them were cheap and very few of
them had much of a lasting impact on
audiences
aside from rabbit heart fans like us
that is flaws and although we love most
of these horrific endeavors taking the
format of 70s classics such as black
Christmas to Texas Chainsaw Massacre and
of course quintessential slasher movie
John Carpenter's Halloween studios
realized they could make a lot of money
chopping up teens so much so that the
genre would collapse in on itself like a
dying star before the decade was dead
the early seventies and then a horror
film with Wes Craven Co last House on
the Left which had some notoriety and
some success initially but as a
byproduct both Wes and I got reputations
as being people that would produce
really disgusting stuff and cheap so if
you want to puke in a bucket and cheap
you know call Shawn and Wes
finally I got to do some kids films in
the late 70s I did a bad news bears kind
of ripoff some cult here comes the
Tigers and after we did that we had this
notion of doing sort of had a soccer
movie at that point everybody was saying
what America really needs now is a good
family film so Shawn and I'm set out and
he got the funding and I love him we
made two wonderful family films and once
again America had lied it did not want
to see a good family films evidently
America wanted to see Halloween because
in 1979 Halloween was absolutely raking
in the box office dollars I was playing
around titles and one of the titles that
just came into my head at the time was
Friday the 13th and out of frustration I
said Friday the 13th Christ if I had a
picture called Friday the 13th I could
sell that I'm gonna make the scariest
picture ever made it's gonna be called
Friday the 13th so I said well my
question and I went to school basically
on the movie Halloween saw it once
figured out what a good horror film
would need first of all you have to
start with a prior evil something that
happened a long time ago that was really
bad then you have to have a group of
adolescents or slightly post adolescents
who
in an environment in which they cannot
be helped by adults the other thing I
learned from Halloween is that if you
make love you get killed so I had to
figure out a way to do that we took out
this ad and variety that said Friday the
13th the most terrifying film ever made
was a great big block letters crashing
through a mirror he was very open about
the fact that he was definitely gonna
make people sit up and watch this in
shown and I talked about all the
possible places and it could be and I
came up with summer camp how far is it
to Camp Crystal Lake they have to watch
themselves be thinned out one by one I
had some theater owners from Boston who
had invested initially in Last House on
the Left and they came in for a
meaningful chunk with all that stuff at
hand suddenly I was able to raise the
money to make a picture called Friday
the 13th could you catch up when we were
doing the set up for the movie we heard
this kind of Walter corny the function
of crazy Ralph is to set the tone for
this horrible geographic area you're
just a cast nobody that wasn't willing
to go out and get dirty and have special
effects applied to them and just accept
it on faith we're gonna go out and do
all this stuff but I but I swear to god
it's gonna be okay as long as I have
you'll do anything everybody was young
and over acting terribly overacting
everybody hey wasn't that the road up
for Camp Crystal Lake back there we shot
this picture in a tiny little town New
Jersey called Blairstown we shot
completely below the radar out of a Boy
Scout camp camp Nobby Bosco that's what
it was which stands for North Bergen Boy
Scouts we had to wait for the Boy Scouts
to all go home and go back to school
before we were able to come in make a
contribution to the Boy Scouts and camp
out there basically for three weeks
before we shot the movie
you've captain bees already Jack and
Marcie are gonna get drenched we didn't
actually have a real whole script we
would get pages that day and they would
change what we did have they change them
the next day you know so it was kind of
like we got to find out as we were going
along well I have mrs. Voorhees
the image always was of me was that I
was this girl next door
and of course I've always said that
there wasn't a gal that ever lived next
door to me that I wanted to be like I
got a pretty Betsy Palmer had worked in
television on the morning talk shows and
she was squeaky-clean comparable to the
Doris Day type I was always trying to
prove that I wasn't the girl next door
I had a Mercedes which I'd had a number
of years and it broke down on the
Connecticut Turnpike so I said to myself
I need a new car universe and I went out
to go shopping for a car and I found a
little Scirocco I thought oh that's what
I want I want a cool little car like
this and so the phone rang and my agent
said how would you like to do a movie I
said great that'll pay for the car that
I want to buy and he said well that was
you know there's just one other thing I
have to tell you anything
it's a horror film and I said oh no so
the script came and I read it nice and
what a piece of what monster could've
done this and I said oh nobody is ever
going to see this it will come and it
will go and I'll have my Scirocco so
real I kind of plastic part of Friday
the 13th was taking mom and apple pie
and standing it upside down and saying
you've never seen a mother like this
I didn't get up there and try to play a
bad lady in fact I tried to play a good
lady who had gone a little wrong but
that was because she wanted to save more
children she didn't want them to die and
I couldn't let them live in this place
again this was the mother that I never
had the one who would protect you and go
to any horrible lengths to do it and you
do you want to do that you want to all
of a sudden get very kind of and I was
beginning to do that and shines would
say no no no no Betsy he said to us play
it straight that's all kill her mommy
kill her what we needed to do was create
something that had an element of circus
in it but we had no idea how to do any
of this stuff I think Steve miner said
we should hook up with some Tom Savini
who would work with George Romero and
Dawn of the Dead he would be looking
through my screenplay and me saying well
I noticed you have a hatchet in the face
on page 38 or whatever it was now and he
turned to Shawn and say do you want a
fake face and a real hatchet or you want
to fake hatchet in a real face Savini
just said anything's possible
there was a highly technical special
effect that literally they could only
shoot once I mean when that arrow comes
through and the blood squirts up and Tom
Savini is underneath the cot and he is
squirting blood into this tube with this
plunger
so that can come up through the fake
rubber chest after the shot Shawn says
cut and everybody applauds and Tom
Savini comes out from underneath the bed
covered in blood and it's sheeps blood
and he's an encompass like this and it's
just awful
and somebody says what happened and he
said well I I started to hit the pump
and the fitting gave way so blood was
going all over the place so he had to
literally blow on the pipe to make the
blood come up through the arrow and then
look like Kevin Bacon was squirting all
over the place if you're gonna sit there
and blow sheep's blood up through a tube
in Kevin Bacon's alleged chest you're
giving a lot and then of course you get
the one shot with the hatchet in the
face which is of course the styrofoam
hatchet glued onto the real face
and that was the other thing about it
you waited for the next one that
happened it's about to build up to the
tension it's about the don't go in
there's it's about oh don't go in there
one of the most memorable aspects is the
music it's iconographic now excite
people come up to me oh you did and
everybody thinks is cha cha cha I like
cha cha cha what are you talking about I
got this idea from the picture there's a
close-up boat Betsy Palmer's now kill it
the mouth is going to kill him okay
mommy so I got the wacky idea to take
kill her Bonnie the first letter of
first two letters have killed ki and ma
ma and then there was a gizmo we had :
Echoplex which were using a lot in the
film I went to the microphone and I
don't know why but like I just went and
it went
then
oh so I think it's obviously a success
because everybody remembers it and we
were at the at the last last last
penultimate draft and Sean said Viktor
we need a chair jumper for the end and I
said okay and I went back to my drawing
board and borrowed from all of the best
horror films I've ever seen and so we
have a dream sequence with Adrian King
floating around in a rowboat and then
the hand coming out of the water and
it's Jason the ghost story is over so
you can turn on the lights so dawn comes
up and she's on this beautiful placid
lake when the kid comes up out of the
bottom of that lake comes up musically
at a point where it's all so unexpected
then you had the audience
the part of jason's we wound up hiring
are eve lehman he came out and did it we
were both so cold and freezing they had
the heaters there and you know they had
towels as soon as we came out and we did
it a few times I know cuz we're gonna
get it we're gonna get it right don't
worry about this is it but I certainly
did not suggest in that team that he was
hydrocephalic or or deformed in any way
Tommy Savini showed me this Polaroid and
I didn't have my glasses on him at that
night and I said now who is this he said
oh that's your son Jason I said why does
he look so strange he said oh he's a
mongoloid I said what I said that wasn't
in the script he said no but they
thought he didn't look weird enough so
we are making them up because of the
nature of the nightmare ending and
because they Shawn had Tom Savini on
board it's such a fabulous makeup artist
they turned him into sort of a monstrous
looking cretins I mean he just looked
awful we had screenings for ourselves
then we had the first screening that I
recall for Paramount and if you call the
ending when that head pops up I swear
people just jumped at it and I think
that's the thing that's sold it and the
next thing I know paramount has bought
the movie and is gonna do this massive
release in all these theaters I'm going
wow Warner Brothers took foreign
distribution paramount took domestic at
that point Frank Mancuso was running
distribution for Paramount and he made a
choice to take this no star independent
film release it nationally with a
national budget and see what happens and
the notion of doing an independent film
that would ever be released nationally
had never occurred
the opening night on Broadway it was
just it was packed do they know what
they're and they jumped every single
time something happened there were real
screams screaming running out of the
theater in the middle of the film just
screaming and yelling the best part of
watching project at 13th in theaters and
I was watching the audience say don't go
in there yeah I mean literally talking
to the screen saying girl don't go in
there you don't want to go there and
Shaun would just go on I got him I got a
wall the kids had come out of the
theater telling the kids are coming in
this year to all you better look out or
there was so much fun and it became a
really big social event the next thing I
knew I was looking at the Variety
results and we were in the top ten
people poured into the theaters to see
this and kept coming and kept coming and
kept Tommy they started talking about 10
million 20 million 30 million dollars
when the film was released by and large
it was dismissed by the critics as being
exploitative and just not really worthy
of attention
the critics universally hated it I read
that that I'm really awful and that the
movie sucks
and that we all suck uh one of them was
fit to be tight because I had done this
movie how dare I let my viewing audience
down by playing this horrible woman
he said you write to her so there were
people who were disappointed in me
parents and educators would say this is
not a productive use of your time the
feminists didn't like it particularly
who's gonna die well the sluts gonna die
for sure
and a good person the virgin she will
survive did she live because you were a
good girl I never bought into the notion
of sex equals death that the reason
everybody gets punished in horror films
is because they're sexually promiscuous
I would certainly raise that if you make
love before you're married you are gonna
get punished somehow we weren't
we were just messing I'm not sure
whether the vengeful moralistic tone of
the movie was anything I was thinking of
consciously I was basically working from
what I had seen in my own movie going
experience prior to that that if you
were following your lustful heart that
you were going to get nailed for it that
was at least the Puritan ethic that I
was brought up with this but it was
getting interesting
I didn't look at it that way as you know
the victim I actually thought it was an
empowering position I lived have I
written something that caused people to
go off you know if there's a paranoid
schizophrenic got their who's seen
Friday the 13th 147,000 times should I
feel guilty if he goes up and murdered
somebody
ma'am we didn't find any boy can he
still be we started talking about doing
a sequel within days really of the
initial success and that came directly
from paramount
you killed eight people maybe next year
you should kill 12 people my friends in
Boston felt it was really important to
bring back this Jason character well I
thought that was just the worst idea I
ever heard I was completely wrong
there was no hockey mask which became
one of the icons in the film it was
never my idea to put a hockey mask on
anybody because I had nothing to do with
parts - through whatever I said I don't
know who this guy in the hockey mask is
I would never have done what I did to
camp blood if my little boy hadn't
drowned I said he's at the bottom of the
lake Friday the 13th
kind of became its own little industry
to MIT the most important thing you can
do in a film career is make money
because if you make money but people
will let you make more films and take
other chances and nobody will blame them
so I've had a lot of opportunities given
to me as a result of doing this one
little film in New Jersey oh god help my
kids maybe producing Friday the 13th
movies long after I'm gone even people
who aren't huge fans of the horror film
in general still point to Halloween as a
magnificent film groundbreaking film but
on the other hand Friday the 13th which
came out only two years after Halloween
is looked upon with really universal
derision but the truth is Friday the
13th is actually an extremely well-made
and suspenseful film the only difference
is that while the murders and Halloween
were in the shadows off camera dare I
say classy
the Friday the 13th they were in your
face you actually saw a real live
decapitation without a cutaway in full
view of the audience and audiences had
never seen that before they were
prepared for it and it was really
surprised that I was I got a taste of it
they wanted more
bloody birthday day overwhelming film
you won't soon forget
when you know how to celebrate every day
is Mother's Day final exam he's come
back on the one night they were
celebrating New Year's Eve he was out
ending that there by this latest motion
picture is another you're making nothing
but really big films now we're talkin
the last one was money pit which st yeah
they're good whether you're Jackie
Gleason yeah it's big time and we're
making with only big time folks so I
mean the big day when there was a time I
guess when you obviously we're not in
the big tide did not make big time comes
for a great majority of my life as a
matter of fact what was the first film
you made the first actual appearance on
camera I made in a movie was a movie
called he knows you're alone which is a
epic hack-and-slash of film you remember
the hack-and-slash period of filmmaking
in which every movie had a knife you
know the girl would be at home with a
pan across the kitchen there would be a
nice loaded loaded with knives and she'd
hear a noise should go off and on the
part of the house can you come back
without a knife type of movie better how
long ago was it this was eight hundred
years ago this is 1943 78 79
so was that before your television show
yeah it was it was I played a guy in
this movie I always said that if this
was Gilligan's Island I would have
played the professor it was it was that
bad
and did was the thing released it
actually would can we were making it
when the guy wrote it who was a very
nice guy very talented right it was
called shriek told while we're making
was called the uninvited what did this
mean nobody really know and then MGM no
they cut it together and release it as
Blood Wedding finally finally came out
of the title he knows your lungs your
look the whole title was he knows you're
alone so don't go in the house cuz he's
gonna stab you with a knife and this is
the all of the victims were surprised
that was a deal there's a psycho killer
had to kill Brides now he could either
walk into you know a place where a
wedding was going on and like slash away
oriented over here somebody talking
about their wedding or go to
Bloomingdale's look through the registry
I just yeah find out who's getting
married number seven oh nine what's the
pattern on the knives
I'm most interested in fear the
emotional fear for example why after
seeing psycho were so many people afraid
to take shower not me you were afraid
right you bet fascinate people pay to be
scared when you think about it at linear
college they have the finest security
the best teacher student relations
strictly enforced curfews and killer you
had a situation where one film led to
another led to another it wasn't as if
you know the National Endowment of the
Arts was throwing money at these
producers because the slasher film was
really helping the culture it was that
filmmakers cinema by accident hit a pine
a formula that was so embraced by the
mainstream movie going teenage audience
that they just took off and for years
and years they producers and directors
could really do no wrong any shitty
movie with the holiday in the title with
the mask killer that was attacking
usually scantily clad dressed females
just did bananas at the box office one
terrifying night about speakable evil
New Year's
in the early 80s when the slasher film
was in its heyday this correspond did
with the birth of the home video
generation so you had a whole new
demographic of kids of fans loved and
devoured these films we're never in a
million years would have been able to
see them in the multiplex success breeds
success an imitation really is the
sincerest form of flattery and nowhere
is that more apparent than in the
slasher film so while these great
American slashers were in their heyday
you also had other countries trying to
copy their success you had bloody moon
out of Spain had snap shot or the day
after Halloween from Australia also from
Australia you had nightmares also known
as stage fright pieces which was
financed by American money it had a
Spanish director it was set in the US
but actually filmed in Spain and then of
course you had all we think of as
prototypical American slashers like My
Bloody Valentine happy birthday to me
from the territory they were really
Canadian tax sheltered movies which were
usually produced directed and starred
Canadian filmmakers now the latest
breaking Eyewitness News with Jerry
Dunphy Christine lund ed Arnold for Ted
Dawson with sports Johnny mountain with
the weather and the Eyewitness News team
horror movie opened tonight in Hollywood
officially and all over the Los Angeles
area there's a lot of controversy over
this one which is why we're paying
attention to it feminists in particular
said that this is a film that promotes
harm to women and Martin has more on it
right now and Christine the movie is
maniac and the billboards themselves are
pretty gruesome movie goers tonight told
me the plot is a man who hated his
mother goes out and kills women besides
the billboard the picture is also
advertising as the movie the LA Times
wouldn't run ads for now president
Eleanor Smeal had this reaction to the
Billboard all I can say is that when you
talk about violence towards women and
brutality this just typifies it and I
think that it is shocking and it
contributes to the injury of woman
tonight I asked moviegoers who had just
seen the film if they thought it was
potentially injurious to women yeah I'm
gonna be scared to walk out at night
really now
you think it was unfair to women
how about you what did you think of it I
think it was a sick movie it was where
they it was kind of stupid you know but
I wasn't as scary as I planned it to be
like other movies I seen like Texas
Chainsaw Massacre or something like that
did you think that a movie like that
would would inspire violence towards
women
I think some guys might have ideas
watching this you know if they're sick -
coming in here and you never know two
young men who were about to see maniac
said movies are fiction it's real life
that's scary bothers you to see some guy
like Bittaker for instance who's
convicted of doing torture and murder on
young girls but it doesn't bother you to
see this well no not really because the
movie well it's just a movie
it's fiction but bittakers case that's
true it freaks me out a little
this doesn't give you nightmares No
you are a young woman do you think it
might yeah definitely I wouldn't be
seeing the problem woman so far the
movie management there told me the movie
is doing a fair business it's British we
look back at these slasher films and we
think that they're fun and cheesy and
that'll be harmless forms of
entertainment at the time the country
was really in an uproar over them they
were looked at you know along with heavy
metal one of the chief corrupters of
America's youth
if you must hide if you can scream if
you are able but above all if you are
alone don't answer the phone
rated R TV commercials like that one
exploiting the plight of women in danger
those ads have been saturating
television for the past two years and
the summer and fall of 1980 are the
worst yet they signify a disturbing new
trend at the movie box office one we'll
be discussing on this special edition of
sneak previews across the aisle for me
as Gene Siskel film critic of the
Chicago Tribune and this is Roger Ebert
film critic of the Chicago sun-times now
normally on sneak previews Roger and I
review new movies this week however
we're going to be looking at a group of
recent films that have some very ugly
things in common all of these films are
thrillers featuring extreme violence
directed at young women to put it
bluntly what you see in most of these
films is a lot of teenage girls being
raped or stabbed to death usually both
this is a depressing development in
American movies and on this show we'll
examine the nature of this trend and
then speculate on why we're getting so
many of these films and getting them now
a lot of movie goers adults and
teenagers both go to see these are rated
films and they assume well they're just
going to see a bunch of routines scary
pictures but oftentimes they're really
shocked how awful these films are to
begin with one of the things the so
called women in danger films all have in
common is that they portray women as
helpless victims and after you set
through a dozen or so of these films as
Gina Ryan Jean and I have unfortunately
had to
they all fall into the same pattern a
woman or a young girl is shown a lone
isolated and defenseless and then come
suspense building scenes where the girl
think she's about to be attacked but she
isn't and then just when you think
everything's going to be okay and
nothing's gonna happen a crazy killer
Springs out of the shadows an attack sir
and frequently the killer sadistically
threatens the victim before he strikes
you know a lot of people think that the
battle has been won in Hollywood on
films about women they think that now
women have parity with men that they're
strong women images in the films Jill
Clayburgh and an unmarried woman Jane
Fonda in every picture she makes got it
all wrong
findin Clayburgh make up one film a year
maybe right these films are coming out
week after week
playing to millions of people and the
dominant image in American films today
on women is not founded in Clayburgh
it's women like that cowering in the
corner knives being brandished in their
faces being raped being sliced apart
that's what's going on in American
movies that's why we're doing the show I
think a lot of people have the wrong
idea they identify these films with
earlier thrillers like psycho or even in
our recent film like Halloween which we
both like these films aren't in the same
category these films hate women
and unfortunately the audience's that go
to them don't seem to like women too
much either now we go to see these films
and movie theaters these are not the
kinds of movies where they have nice
private little screenings for the
critics and to sit there surrounded by
people who are identifying not with the
victim but with the attacker with the
killer who are cheering these killers on
is a very scary experience
yeah the movies are played so that they
really are in favor almost of the killer
and really against the women cowering
back I don't think we can stress this
too strongly that we're not talking
about it just a couple of films it seems
like we're getting new ones of these
kind of films every other week that
amounts to a major movie trend here are
some examples
there's prom night with teenage girls
being slaughtered at their high school
prom the ad campaign is if you're not
back by midnight you won't be coming
home there's don't go in the house a guy
who was tortured by his mother
burns three woman's of death the cell
line here is you have been warned
and there's terror training which six
college students at a masquerade party
on a train
stalked by a psychopath and there's the
boogeyman a supernatural killer haunts a
house here's one of the ads for the
boogeyman you can't hide from him
by the time they believe in him it'll be
too late
the boogeyman he's going to get you and
we're out to get the boogeyman before he
gets you in you're four bucks now a week
after week these other kinds of movies
were getting it is relentless every film
company seems to be making one of these
movies or distributing one that some
fast buck artists has already made in
addition to the films we've already
mentioned this season we also have he
knows you are alone Motel hell phobia
Mother's Day schizoid silent scream and
I Spit on Your Grave which is easily the
worst of this disgusting bunch the
newspaper ads for these films are bold
and the way they suggest terror but in
no way in many cases do the ads really
prepare you for the kind of explicit
violence we end up getting on the screen
decapitations are not uncommon and shots
repeated stabbing shots of all parts of
women's bodies are grotesquely routine
think at this point somebody is probably
wondering why why why Natalie why is
this happening I have a theory in the
last couple of months I've been seeing
these pictures I'm convinced it has
something to do with the growth of the
woman's movement in America in the last
decade I think that these films are some
sort of primordial response by some very
sick people of men saying get back in
your place women these women in the
films are typically portrayed as
independent as sexual as enjoying life
and the killer typically not all the
time but most often is a man who is
sexually frustrated with these new
aggressive women and so he strikes back
at them he throws knives at them he
can't deal with them he cuts them up he
kills them get back in your place it's
against the women's movement I think
you're basically right gene you know
after you've set through hour after hour
of this complete trash you begin to ask
yourself what did these female victims
do to deserve the horrible attacks they
undergo in these films what was their
crime why is it suddenly open season on
young women in the movies well one thing
that most of the women victims do have
is in common is that they do act
independently and I agree with you on
that point to one degree or another
there are liberated women but choose to
act on their own in the moment that a
woman starts making decisions for
herself in these movies you can almost
bet she's going to end up paying with
her life and horribly
what's your problem you and kids like
you bury one such family I was
particularly shrouded in controversy was
1984 as Silent Night deadly night the TV
spots depicted a man dressed as Santa
carrying an axe and murdering people
causing a rage parents to pick at the
movie during its opening weekend and
subsequently got the movie banned
whether they clearly had not seen the
film many felt that it was wrong for
Santa to be portrayed as a killer not
knowing the fact that it was actually a
deranged a psychologically tortured man
dressed as Santa during the killing as
opposed to Kris Kringle himself still
despite the waves and waves of negative
press for a time being the slasher genre
continued to prosper I would go on and
introduce us to its biggest icon yet
Freddie is the Ultimate Nightmare
a sociable he's a party animal ready
rocks like Freddy's like addicting and
you know it gets better and better each
one scariest movie I've ever seen a long
time I don't think I'll sleep tonight
when right a director Wes Craven first
imagined dream stalker Freddy Krueger
the idea is bouncing around in his head
were equally sick and clever while
sleeping people are at their most
vulnerable making it nearly impossible
to stop Krueger from often whomever he
pleases inquiry imaginative ways
furthermore nobody can stay awake
forever so eventually whether it's after
a week or two months or longer they're
going to enter into Freddy's domain and
the outcome won't be ideal
give me that damn thing it even has his
name written in it Fred Krueger mom Fred
Krueger do you know who that is mother
because if you do you better tell me
because he's after me now we all know
the story Freddy was a child murderer
the parents of his victims burn him
alive and about a decade later he comes
back and starts killing the remaining
children of those parents and their
dreams yeah it was inspired by I think
three articles in the LA times over
period about a year and a half the first
one was kind of sketching it was the
story of a young man dying after having
a severe nightmare and they couldn't
figure out how it happened medically and
then there was a second story about nine
months later and nobody the newspaper
didn't seem to correlate it they didn't
seem to remember the other story and
then the third story and I'm the one
that really made me feel I have to write
a script about this was this kid all
these kids were Asian all over Southeast
Asia all come out of kind of war zones
from Vietnam and Pol Pot yeah you know
the killing fields and their families
had gone through the location camps and
then at the end of the United States
this kid was having nightmares and he
said somebody's after me in my nightmare
if I sleep I know I'm going to die and
as his father was a physician and he
said I'll give you sleeping pills you'll
be all right we've come through a
horrible time now in America you're safe
and the father started giving the kid
sleeping pills
supposedly was taking them but he stayed
up and he stayed up for something like
five days and it was like an amazing
just you know keeping himself awake
almost by putting matchsticks in his
eyes and finally fell asleep while the
family was watching television and they
took him upstairs and put on a bed and
the parents later said we all convinced
that the crisis was over and in the
middle of night they heard screaming and
thrashing him
ran into his room and he was like
kicking and screaming and they got to
I'm gonna just held that and he's dead
and there were three things that really
just made me think this is a movie one
was they did an autopsy on him and
nothing was wrong there was no physical
reason for it the second was that they
found the family said they found all the
sleeping pills that supposedly had taken
hidden so you'd obviously put them in
his mouth and when dad wasn't looking it
was right back out because he didn't
want to sleep and the third thing was
this incredible thing this kid had run
at an extension cord behind his bedroom
curtains and into the closet and he had
a mr. coffee and there was black coffee
so he had a source of keeping awake even
when he was in his room supposedly
sleeping it was just so it was
heart-rending because this kid he was
right you know he died as soon as he
fell asleep
Freddie was based on I think was based
on a man who scared me when I was a
little kid you know again my father was
dead it was always a sense that I had it
but like nobody's around to really
protect us you know his dad's gone and I
just was lying in my bed we had we're in
a second-story apartment and heard this
guy sort of mumbling grumbling and
travelling along and what's the pin down
it was this guy kind of dressed like
Freddie you know dark jacket sort of
brimmed hat that they wore in those days
and he stopped and somehow just look
straight up at me
I just I was so scared you know just
like jump back and I was back in the
shadows waiting for the sound of him
going away and waited waited seemed like
I waited forever finally well he must
have gone and so I went back to the
window and he was there he does mine you
know and then he started walking down
the sidewalk looking over his shoulder
me like and he went into our building so
I don't know who that guy was
but he became Freddie my brother went
down with a baseball bat and the guy ran
away so it's my big brother saved my
life who knows you might have been just
thought out I'll scare this kid for the
hell of it you know so that became the
basis of Freddie just the sort of an
adult that took delight in terrifying a
child was the basis of it and then the
rest was actually a quite intellectual
process of what what will he wear and I
thought you know like an overcoat would
be good and then I thought of the idea
of a janitor so because you know I'd
taught Greek mythology and the descent
into Hades was always going down and
fire and so made his job basically being
in Hades you know the sweater the
striped sweater was a scientific
American article on the two colors that
are the most difficult for the human
retina to see side-by-side stuff of it
that was those colors and there were a
lot of films being made with villains
that had masks but I wanted him to be
able to talk so I said instead of a
hockey mask or whatever
I'll give him a mask of scar tissue and
that would be the way that your parents
killed him and the final thing with the
clause was you know we went through the
usual thing of a hunting knife so it
would be
a scythe should it be you know all this
crap in it so I said when I'll go back
to the most primal of weapon you can
think of and I thought well it would be
tooth and claw you know what men faced
before they had real weapons and then I
thought well cave bears you know that
claw that could come in and grab you and
then combine that with the human hand
you had kind of the elements of both the
ancient and then they were you know
highly evolved dexterous thing that
makes humans so incredibly unique is our
hands you know so putting those two
things together just made made something
was pretty powerful it's funny a
friendly originally I was thinking he
should be a guy in his 70s and we looked
at a lot of you know older gentlemen and
they you know I think if you get to be
70 you're kind of like mellow you know
you've got you've seen it all and you're
just grateful to be alive and life has a
lot more kind of preciousness to it and
so and then Robert Utley came in and it
was like not this guy you know he's too
young and he just had such an enthusiasm
for it and I'd found that and then we'd
looked at a lot of big stuntmen - and I
found stuntmen who were very also very
gentle people in general that they they
were so in control of their body in
physicality they didn't have these
issues you know that people that are a
little bit more normal and you know
we're beat up as kids or whatever and
Robert Englund just had no hesitation to
play something really evil and I
realized that that was what it took it
didn't take an old guy didn't take a big
guy it took somebody who was comfortable
you know looking inside and saying what
would I be like if I was utterly evil a
lot of people can't do that you know
they don't want to go there so the play
kind of bold you know kind of too big
though kind of do it jokey but you know
Robert was willing at least the first
one to be serious and that's what was
the beginning of these films for me was
I believe it was my second audition for
the film I went to a casting office in
Hollywood and it was very crowded there
were
it seemed like 12 or 15 you know young
women and we're each going in one by one
and I got to go in with Amanda Wis and I
we went in together and I read for Wes
and I remember during the reading it
just I was just compelled to make my
fingers into this shape and say it was
just a part in the dialogue where I'm
describing my dream and I just had this
little claw that just just became alive
somehow and and I think Wes really like
and he let everybody go except for me
and and he came out and he said I'd like
you to know that I'd like you to be
Nancy and I just that never happens in
Hollywood they always have your agent
call your people and it's always it's
never like that and that's the kind of
man Wes what I always felt when we were
filming the first movie that it's rare
in in modern films and certainly the
films that I've seen in my life where
the protagonist and the antagonist are
so clearly defined and represent I
actually represent good and evil with no
equivocation at all and Robert Englund
and I talked a lot about the underlying
you know symbolism of our our battle and
Robert is a very intelligent person and
very highly trained actor so he in a lot
of ways encouraged me to think of the
battle on much like more you know
archetypal level if I can use that word
and and so in he and I even today talk
about it as if we're talking about a
Greek tragedy we don't we've never
thought of it literally it's popular
teenager slasher film we always have had
the respect for it that Wes was able to
create a modern myth about you know the
struggle between good and evil and
and as the issues of Nancy's became more
developed so first you just see her as a
teenager then you see her as the child
of a divorced family and then you see
her as a person who's very concerned
about her friends and then in the later
film she's trying to take care of
teenagers and a social worker type and
then finally she's a mother of her own
child and a wife she you know and we
often you know Wes is very I think
concerned that her story was always
toward the good and what our what our
ideals and virtues are all about in our
society and we always talked about those
things and and Robert and I we enjoy
being enemies and we were always you
know playing those kind of tricks and
stuff on each other as that after we had
finished the first film it was it was
such a small film I mean our budget was
so small and I and when we had this
screening we had a little screening room
at Warner Brothers and me and Johnny had
arrived late and Amanda Wes and and all
of the people had come to my house first
and we'd had you know a little
celebration we got to the theatre and
there were no seats for us so we had to
sit on the floor and the fire marshal
came and told us we couldn't show the
film because the theater wasn't big
enough so some people either left or we
ended up sitting on the floor I mean it
was so small film written all over it
you know and our clothes it all come
from the you know Salvation Army
basically it was some new socks thrown
in here and there it was pathetic when I
think about it and and then they made
the second one I thought I can't believe
they're doing that I mean of course it
was successful so I could believe that
they were doing that but to me I was
very glad like I don't want to be part
of that and then I remember a
trick-or-treater came to my door who was
dressed as Freddy and I
he's big he's a household name Freddy
Krueger is it and I was in college at
the time and frat fat fraternities were
having parties and people coming dressed
as Freddy and no one ever came dressed
as Nancy but if people came dressed as
Freddy and I and I thought well this is
even getting bigger and and I realized
this isn't this is what they're gonna
make a lot of money off of and I never
thought I'd be part of it again and then
Wes and Wes it had a falling out with
New Line Cinema's so I knew I was kind
of attached to him and I knew I wouldn't
be a part and then they let Wes write
the third the screenplay for the third
one and he called me and said I'd like
to put your character back in and I'd
only want to do this if you said now
that you would be in it and you know the
same gracious way that he always does
things and I know he called me on my
birthday I said this is the best
birthday present I could have ever
gotten I said this is and I assumed he
would direct it and I was like of course
I'm so excited and then he didn't he
wasn't signed up to direct after all and
Chuck Russell came in and he rewrote and
so we made that film and you know by
then it was just on its own nightmares
they have a way of coming back first and
have one then another
and before you can screen your supper
weight you find yourself plunging into a
Nightmare on Elm Street three dream
warriors yes that's right it's the
return of cult hero Freddy Krueger the
same wild maniac who helped turn first
to nightmares into video blockbusters
nightmare 1 120,000 units nightmare to
180,000 units together these two hits
spent over 50 weeks on billboards rental
charts and for the past two summers
Freddy's nightmares have been the
nation's top video rental titles now
it's Freddy's third time around and he's
all set to claw his way beyond the right
with the release of nightmare screen
Freddy's slashed his way to the top he's
a media phenomenon with featured
appearances on TV shows across the
country
it's the biggest nightmare ever but
nobody's going to lose sleep over this
one
well maybe the makers of platoon because
for the very first time in history a
small independent film has swept the
weekend box office grosses and the top
money-making film this past weekend is
Nightmare on Elm Street 3 dream warriors
with 8 point 8 million
dollars in ticket revenues the number
one movie in the country last week in
Syracuse they called in the Mounted
Police to control the crowds of theaters
out in Los Angeles they chanted Freddy
and guest spots on such nationally
broadcast hits as Good Morning America
and The Late Show with Joan Rivers real
cult figure pretty slimy portrayal of
Freddy Krueger with his razor edge but I
know but those are you don't know who
would talk that here is a picture this
is the third he this is yeah can you get
us on child okay
it is his third film now called
Nightmare on Elm Street the third one
the movie is just open and it's a
blockbuster they made thirty million
dollars in one week alone that's telling
me will will will you please welcome
rich Robert Englund
oh don't leave home without but wait
there's more and are you talking about a
buddy back slice of mattock operator
check out the awesome in-store onslaught
we've done right video stores are in for
their biggest nightmare ever beginning
with Freddie's arrival on this ghastly
in-store banner but a profile a traffic
stopping wall poster a hair-raising 3d
poster for your special media lightbox
disgusting and a monstrous
larger-than-life floor display
guaranteed to have your customers
screaming for a nice slice Plus
Freddie's got a killer contest under his
hat that's guaranteed to cause an elm
street traffic jam in your store
announcing Freddie's be in my nightmares
sweepstakes the grand prize a
once-in-a-lifetime chance to appear on
the screen with Freddie in the upcoming
Nightmare on Elm Street 4 will alert
your customers to this fabulous
promotion with spots on MTV and ads in
prime youth market magazines like
Rolling Stone us circus and Fangoria
it's a fright fanatics dream come true
yes ask your media representative about
this limited time offer don't get caught
sleeping wake up your proper picture
with a feverishly anticipated video
release of a Nightmare on Elm Street
three dream warriors coming soon from
media home entertainment the term
deranged sociopath gets thrown around a
lot by the media but it really applies
to my next guest starting today you can
see them in Friday the 13th party Jason
Takes Manhattan please welcome Jason
yeah
you know what I've noticed I see all
your movies where I know what I really
noticed
you're angry excuse me it's just the way
I am but you're you're you're angry what
happened man when y'all began was it a
woman did you get cut from the hockey
team
let me ask you this I saw the new movie
Jason Takes Manhattan
you killed 16 people
you killed 16 people and you were
responsible for the death of eight
others total that's less than what you
usually kill in a movie are you getting
soft
are you losing in fact it wasn't just a
Friday the 13th franchise I was indeed
losing a step blood gushing Lee great
kills couldn't sustain a genre that
spiraled into creative bankruptcy as the
1980s came to a close
Freddy Krueger became a joke slinging
parody of himself and Jason just got
kind of monotonous and Hara was no
longer fringe interest for teenage
moviegoers the slasher Turner would of
course show its face in the years I
followed but it would never be the same
a slasher movies are the 2000s had
mostly with a few notable exceptions
taking the form of remakes everything
from A Nightmare on Elm Street the prom
night got a glossy update that begged
honest algid but in reality all they did
was make us cherish the slashers of
yesteryear even more
their ambitions were meet their
achievements weaker still and their cost
a profit ratio Stella now pardon us
while you watch Tom Savini get his head
blown off with a shotgun at point-blank
range
you

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listen to them actors of the night what
movies they make in the foothills of the
Transylvanian albs 50 miles from wide
Dracula's castle was a town of Lugo's
hungry where in 1882 Bela Blasco was
born changing his name the Bela Lugosi
he became in his own words a Clark Gable
of the Hungarian stage he fought in
World War one and during the Revolution
worked with the government to help
create an actor union what a new party
came to control he was seen as an enemy
he eventually made his way to Broadway
learning his early parts phonetically
and in 1927 he got the role of his
lifetime Dracula to get into character
he would stare into a mirror and repeat
over and over
I am the regula I am Dracula the
audience went batty forum especially
women who saw him as a demonic version
of the recently deceased Idol Ralf
Valentino in 1931 Baylor reprised his
role for universals movie version and
then that point on in everyone's mind
he was Count Dracula being typecast in
horror his career had its ups and downs
especially as he got older but
regardless of the size of a park or the
budget of the movie he always gave
uniquely terrifying performance and here
is top 10
miss fame has two killer
[Music]
[Laughter]
[Music]
Larry Talbot is bitten by a werewolf
a yellow fortune teller and becomes a
werewolf himself this has me in a hairy
situation the Wolfman is a classic
Universal monster movie Layla's part is
small but he's so memorable that I
couldn't overlook it
he's what you'd imagine a gypsy
fortune-teller to be not only being
really Hungarian but also being
extremely charismatic and within a few
minutes he conveys this otherworldly
haunted doom where you believe he's
about to turn into a werewolf and kill
an innocent victim
[Music]
I will not disappoint you my lady cut
the cards
[Music]
I cannot tell you anything tonight come
back tomorrow
now go in it go quickly go he dies early
on but he's referred to a lot and is
important to the story so you need that
strong impression
plus it's fitting they have one
universal monster Dracula create another
now Bayla had hoped to play the main
wolf man but by 1941 Universal was born
to the much younger Lon Chaney jr.
making it even worse was every time long
the Greek Bayla he would say hey pop
murder lissandra is a zombie master who
uses voodoo to turn a young bride into a
zombie they're zombies fangs and better
Lugosi fans
this movie is spooktacular it is the
first-ever zombie movie now they're more
voodoo based than the more recent
flesh-eating zombies but they're still
eerie because they're like a walking
corpse and it's actually more accurate
to what a zombie really is now for
Lugosi fans not only does he have a
great part he also helped write and
direct so you get more of his creativity
the after playing Dracula unsaved
hundreds of times and seeing that
audience reaction he knew what made him
scary
[Music]
[Music]
who are you and why they for you my
friend
they are the Angels of Death in Dracula
his eyes are like pure evil in his hand
gestures were weird in otherworldly and
here they utilize them even more with
close-ups and special effects some of
the other actors are a little iffy and
there are some pacing issues but with
Bela is the epitome of sophisticated
evil bearing a striking resemblance to
Satan
combined with haunting visuals and
sounds white zombie is like a living
nightmare dr. Paul Carruthers has
created a giant bat they'll attack
anyone wearing his special brand of
aftershave lotion as things got tough
Bayless started doing low-budget horror
movies like at PRC studios in monogram
but regardless of quality he always gave
it his all so the very least his B
movies are fun but the devil bat is the
most fun he plays a mad scientist which
he's always good at plus it has that
Dracula connection of creating giant
bats his plan sounds so silly there's
entertaining and he has a groovy
catchphrase they says to each person
that he's about to kill why don't you
try a few drops of my new shaving lotion
or rub it on the tender parts of your
neck here hmm very soothing
well good night doctor goodbye Roy
[Music]
as a joke when Bailey would leave for
the day he would say goodbye to people
like that
goodbye Dave well the supporting cast
aren't the best actors they're still
charming the funny and while the devil
bad itself may look fake it's still cool
so I am just a baddie over this movie
number seven
I'm in the lost soul on an uncharted
island dr. Moreau crates half man half
animals in the House of Pain the leader
of this group is the Sayer of the law
this movie is so eerie you're on an
uncharted island cut off from
civilization there are tons of horrific
makeups we hear screaming from the house
of pain and there's Charles laden is dr.
Moreau whose most sadistic and amusing
there's only one thing that could make
it scarier Dracula himself Mayo Lugosi
no Bella was a generous man and a big
spender for example while he was
celebrating the premiere of Dracula in
New York he tipped the Hungarian gypsy
band so much that some of the musicians
moved to California to be by him so in
1932 he was in bankruptcy court and had
to take this smaller role however he
dominates the scariest scene the law is
not to spill blood but Moreau tells or
on to kill the sea captain
so Baylor reasons that the law is off
[Music]
[Music]
Lugosi is so powerful you feel the agony
he went through in the House of Pain but
you also feel how passionate he is about
getting his revenge and all the
creatures are right behind him as they
corner Moreau into his own House of Pain
[Music]
in 1918 the vampire Armand Tesla is
staked
but during World War two a Nazi bomb
hits the cemetery and Tesla comes back
for revenge
to me BAE Lugosi is the greatest movie
vampire in the 30s and 40s
if you said vampire you thought of him
that's what they look like that's what
they talk like that's not to act like
but for whatever reason Universal never
used him in any of the Dracula sequels
now this was made by Columbia so they
couldn't call him Dracula but it's
available go Z as a vampire so many
consider this to be his unofficial
Dracula sequel and because there had
been so many advancements in horror
films since he made Dracula in 1830 he's
able to do things he never did before
there are haunting shots of him in the
fog and when his fingers come out from
his grave his slave is a werewolf and
they do more special effects like when
he dies his face melts off his situation
is new too because he's out for revenge
he's more sinister than ever before what
is that to me I no longer need you
Andreas your usefulness is over the way
for me idiot go back to that corner
remainder to die
it's also made and set during World War
two which i think is the most
fascinating war and air raids and Nazi
bombs are seen as just part of life
because men were fighting women took on
a lot of traditional male jobs and you
actually get a female vampire hunter
Lady Jane who is a great character
by the way Bella was making this movie
during the day and starring in the play
Arsenic and Old Lace at night and he
would get tired so during lunch he would
take a nap in his coffin
dr. Valen who's obsessed with Edgar
Allen Poe falls in love with Jim
Thatcher but her father disapproves so
he gets his revenge by using torture
devices inspired by the writings of Poe
most of the universal monster actors
like Boris Karloff and launching a new
year specialized in bringing sympathy to
other monster roles or as bailiffs
specialized in going for all-out evil in
here he really gets to go for all-out
evil as his most insane character dr.
bollen on-screen Bayla is just as dark
and macabre as was writing and with his
grave voice he was a natural for doing
Poe in movies radio onstage and even
television and in this he tortures
people elaborate death traps
he turns Boris Karloff into a monster
and always has a great spooky line to
say while doing it
[Applause]
I fixed my ball make me look good Bella
also has his greatest co-star at his
side Boris Karloff the two men more or
less started the horror genre in
American film with Dracula and
Frankenstein and on screen
they were amazing together however while
they were alive Boris was a bigger star
he always got top billing
he always made more money and there
eight movies together he usually had the
better part but not here I can't help it
bill is my favorite so I get all the
spooky talents of Boris Karloff while
still having my go-to ghoul at center
stage
baron wolf on frankenstein the son of
dr. Henry Frankenstein has come to the
village of Frankenstein with his family
and under the manipulation of Igor
revives the monster this is the third
entry in universals Frankenstein
franchise and just like the monster it
is so well put together the story is
great with Wolf defending his father's
legacy at the sake of his own family
the sets are spooky and expressionistic
there's dark humor and a spectacular
cast the original and best friend inside
Boris Karloff is back in his final
official performances the monster Basil
Rathbone as dr. Frankenstein
Lionel owls the inspector and Bay Lugosi
is Igor and after Dracula this is
usually considered his greatest role
they cut me down because I said he's
menacing and creepy and gets the monster
to kill for him but he's also strangely
endearing and actually really funny
Balin Lugosi loved doing comedy and was
especially proud of how well his comic
timing came up here he's totally
different from Dracula and is he you're
creating yet another unforgettable
horror character in number three I go to
visit an old friend the black cat doctor
Vitas Vargas has come for revenge
against the war traitor
Hjalmar pearling who caused the death of
10,000 soldiers and Fort Mars during
World War one I think this is bae Lugosi
spookiest movie with the darkest
atmosphere the main setting homers house
is built upon the fork where it causes
death of 10,000 soldiers and you see all
the headstones outside some of the
horrors are seen like when Hjalmar leads
up
massive human sacrifice while others are
unseen and just implied like the
necrophilia we see that Hjalmar has a
room filled with in bombed women but
it's the way he looks at him that tells
us why in all of it just gives the black
cat this twisted evil feeling and
speaking of twists bay Lugosi is
actually the hero dr. Rita's Berta gasps
just like his character Bayla was in
World War one he saw countless men get
shot and even burned to death when he's
talking about the war you sense his real
memories coming through the masterpiece
of construction built upon the ruins of
the masterpiece of destruction the nest
of ISA murderer the murderer of 10,000
men returns to the police of his crime
those who died were fortunate I was
taken to cougar cougar where the soul is
killed
slowly 15 years I rotted in the darkness
waited not to kill you to kill your soul
slowly near the conclusion we get
another Transylvanian twist Bela finds
out that Boris is married Baylor's
daughter and that Boris has just killed
her Bela goes insane and skins boris
karloff alive his intensity is
terrifying he's so into it and it makes
the movie even darker because your hero
is crazier than your villain this is
also their first and best pairing
because they're cast as rivals even
though they're not playing Dracula and
Frankenstein this really is the first
monster vs. monster movie the suspense
is building the entire time and when
they finally battle it out is so
exciting
[Music]
Count Dracula tries to put Wilbur Grey's
brain into the body of the Frankenstein
monster but chick young the Wolfman and
Wilbur himself try to stop him I think
this is the best horror comedy ever made
because both the comedy and the horror
are done brilliantly first of all you
get the classic comedy team of the bossy
Bud Abbott and the childlike Lou
Costello they become bigger teams like
who's on first verbal comedy and
hilarious slapstick and this is their
best movie now Lou Costello is
especially funny when he's scared which
is perfect because they go up against
four monsters and the four monsters are
all clicked by the actors who had played
them in the regular horror movies they
recreate the roles dramatically they're
spooky and bringing an authentic horror
atmosphere we have the original Wolfman
Lon Chaney jr. Glenn strange who played
the monster in the last two movies a
cameo by Vincent prices the Invisible
Man he had played them in the biz old
man returns and of course
Bailey Lugosi in his second and final
movie appearance as Count Dracula he's
just as dark and mysterious as he was in
1931 he's the main villain of the story
does this iconic cape move and his
strange gestures to hypnotize Lou
Costello which he did in the play
Dracula but didn't get to do in the
movie version he also does this groovy
animated bat transformation and gets a
couple of spooky jokes I've heard so
much about you I feel as if we've
already met what we need today is young
blood and brains I heard you were going
to masquerade ball you young people
making the most of life while it lasts
while it was sometimes difficult to
recreate his greatest character among
the zany
did it it had a great time making the
movie he even took his son to the set
the final thing that I love about this
movie is how accessible it is to any
person of any age some old movies can be
hard for newcomers to get into but not
happen Costello me Frankenstein I can
watch this movie with my dad who's in
his 50s and we love it and I've showed
this movie to my friend's niece who is 4
years old and she loved it in fact the
next morning she was walking around the
house with her blanket like a cape like
Dracula it was her first introduction to
be a Lugosi my first introduction to be
Lugosi and the perfect introduction to
the classic trakula the number one movie
is Dracula
but the help of the real estate agent
mr. Renfield Count Dracula travels from
Transylvania to England in search of new
blood and only professor van Helsing can
stop him I know it gets criticized for
the second half being a little slow but
it's only an hour in 14 minutes and you
cannot get the full bail it was the
experience without watching Dracula
Dracula is what made him a horror icon
when you watch it you'll understand why
it's his masterpiece betrayal is his
scariest performance first of all he is
everything that you want out of a
Dracula in terms of appearance he is the
iconic look Halloween decorations are
based on him and not the novel's
depiction his accent is real he also has
a strange speech pattern that makes him
sound undead he's charismatic and
attractive but also mysterious haunting
and pure evil just look at his eyes they
look like the bloodthirsty eyes of a
vampire all he needs is a little spooky
lighting and that's what makes him so
scary is that it seems natural even
though he's acting he really seems like
Dracula of a vampire while Beyla is the
best thing in the movie there's also
creepy atmosphere the film hardly has
any music and some of the scenes are
actually silent which creates us a weird
haunting feeling there's iconic dialogue
and he resets like Dracula's castle with
his huge cobwebs which has become the
prototype for a scary castle
I am Dracula oh it's really good to see
you I don't know what happened to the
driver and my luggage and with all this
I thought I was in the wrong place I
mean you're welcome
[Music]
listen to them
super another night what music they make
despite that are spinning his web for
the unwary fly the blood is life mr.
Renfield
yes now there are two other iconic
horror performances first there's Dwight
Frye is Dracula's insect-eating slave
Renfield
if it wasn't for Lugosi this movie could
have been called Renfield because he's
so good he's sympathetic insane spooky
and even darkly funny he has a terrific
crazy laugh
[Music]
then is Edward Devane Sloane who was
also in the play is Dracula's
arch-nemesis the vampire hunter
professor van Helsing
in 1931 most people didn't know anything
about vampires but he explains the
vampire lore so authoritative Lee and
intelligently that has become general
knowledge and on a personal note it's my
favorite movie ever in castelló it's
what introduced me to Bayla but this is
what got me into him it made me want to
learn more plus no self-respecting
horror fan should go without watching
the original Dracula now after the movie
Baylor would continue to play Dracula on
stage throughout his life sometimes
being billed as Dracula himself Bale
Lugosi and when he died he was buried in
full Dracula costume now that's a horror
icon
[Laughter]

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[Music]
[Music]
how are things down the other end
[Music]
[Music]
this is like living in Pittsburgh if you
can call that living yes a couple of
people have made that observation that
it's like working in a foreign country
you working in Pittsburgh there gives a
lot of and it
Wow in addition to freedom it gives you
a different perspective you're not so
much a victim of trends of popular
thinking of you know you know what's in
the state of the art head right this is
a scene from Night of the Living Dead
low-budget film co-authored directed
photographed and edited by George Romero
1968 already the head of a successful
commercial production house in
Pittsburgh this was his first venture
into feature filmmaking its flaws were
mainly budgetary while its virtues were
clearly visionary earning it popular
success as a horror film and a cult
following for exploratory uses of genre
and technique
[Music]
[Applause]
[Music]
style is difficult to define but even in
this disembodied could the technical
aspects of Romero's style are making
themselves apparent there in his cutting
his camera angles
in his two-dimensional design within the
film frame
great spatial movements from shot to
shot
and even within shots
[Music]
just making films in Pittsburgh for ten
years has become a sort of stylistic
statement in January of 78 Romero and
his producer Richard Rubenstein allowed
a film crew from the School of Visual
Arts onto the set of their latest
production the second part of the Dead
trilogy Dawn of the Dead using footage
shot over one long weekend
a documentary took shape focusing first
on the filmmaking process and secondly
on directorial vision what part of it
reaches the screen on hammered what
external force is affected but first
let's introduce our cast in
pre-production George Romero
screenwriter Richard Rubenstein producer
in production George Romero directing
richard rubin scene producing
Michael Gornick cinematographer Karl
Augustine lighting director Tom Savini
creator of special makeup actor and
stuntman Ken Foree actor Scott Ryan agur
actor David mg actor
John am please actor in margin and
casting director of dawn and in
post-production editing the film
pre-production involves writing the
screenplay
raising the money and organizing the
shoot I'm going to New York right thank
you and good night
thank you good night these are the
opening moments of Martin a film Romero
made just before dawn as the story
unfolds you'll see the screenplay
quality's all inherently cinematic which
begin to articulate his style first the
visual imperative with few exceptions
cinema relies as little as possible on
the spoken word characterization and
plot our best revealed through action
and accumulation of detail
[Music]
montage concepts begin in the screenplay
[Music]
[Applause]
[Music]
the story is developing with literally
no dialogue and suspense is being
generated not only in the horror of the
situation but in the mystery of the plot
itself we still don't know his identity
his motives or his goal
Romero's use of dual linear movement
fleshes out the two dimensions of film
into three a use of such devices as the
manipulation of time or other devices
such as irony
[Music]
as you can see from the final page of
the dawn screenplay Romero's use of the
form is unorthodox in a medium where one
page generally equals one minute of film
the script seems long did you plan to
shoot at all I mean giving yourself
leeway in the cutting pretty much yeah I
usually write long scripts Martin was a
long script that was really a long
script I mean the first cut came out at
almost two hours for 45 minutes well
this is a long script that seems long
it's not really long there's so much
description and and if you read those
pages there's so much action described
in in great paragraphs where I got
carried away you know describing the
action itself and some of those things
take a second and a half you know and
it's not cutting that long we did I cut
the first half of the film and it came
in at 45 minutes so I don't I think the
first cut will probably be about a
two-hour cut which is not bad for a
frozen path to what extent do other
influences creep into a work and at what
stage
a lot of people often compared you to
Hitchcock but you don't buy that how how
come they have some nerve no I don't
well every you know filmmaking is funny
filmmakers all artists I guess to some
extent are parasitic of what they've
seen and and what they are basically
imitating what attracted them in the
first place
filmmakers maybe more than any other
form I mean it's not like you can sit
down with a pencil and do you think or a
canvas or whatever it's very expensive
and very few people get enough chance to
work with the hardware and get enough
chance to really develop a style or a
you know accept on a very intellectual
level that's why unfortunately the state
of the art is somewhat gone towards
menus and pre-planning and everything
else which is a little bit destructive I
would say that if I'm parasitic of
anybody it's more Welles and some of the
early like Howard Hawks and people like
that does the films that really affected
me there are certain Hitchcockian things
that are I don't first of all I don't
consciously when I'm setting up a shot
saying wow remember that shot and then
try to imitate that the there are
Hitchcock type influences I think the
sequence in the cemetery at night
where he'd seen a figure way in the
background and you don't really know
what it is and then it gradually gets
worked into the plot it starts to become
a threat and then the threat is a real
threat that's kind of a Hitchcockian
sequence hey I mean praying's for church
huh come on I haven't seen you in church
lately well there's not much sense in my
going to church do you remember one time
when we were small we were out here it
was from right over there I jumped out
at you from behind the tree and grandpa
got all excited he shook his fist at me
and he said boy you'll be damned to hell
remember that right over there well you
used to really be scared here Johnny
you're still afraid stop it now I mean
it they're coming to get you Barbara
stop it
you're ignorant they're coming for you
Barbara stop it you're acting like a
child they're coming for you look there
comes one of them now you'll hear you
here he comes now I'm getting out of
here Johnny a couple of pieces that I've
seen written about neither Living Dead
say that it takes us back to silent
cinema storytelling
[Music]
[Applause]
I can see now a couple of specific
things in a couple of my films that are
Hitchcock in that way
sometimes people say it because of the
plotlines beings there are certain
ironies and the plots that I use I
didn't think anything to do with form I
think that's more content association
that people are making the thing was the
movie that knocked me down when I was a
kid that's the one I think horror film
everyone says what attracts you to the
genre and it was probably the thing I
was exactly I was the right age at
exactly the right time and it had
exactly the right effect I never forgot
the scene Oh graphics of the thing and
those of night and Dawn are remarkably
similar confined spaces within which
groups of protagonists are eternally on
guard against a deadly foe tranquility
never exists in Romero's world
yeah but Sousou you could also say his
Styles derived from DW Griffith's
because he uses close-ups the truth of
it is artists imprint distinctive auras
on their films genres a term which
should have been invented by the
distributors for the artists it's just a
departure point thank you casting occurs
in pre-production is it an irony in both
night and dawn that Romero's main
protagonists are black in night Living
Dead the character if you read it if you
read the script that if you read my
shooting script the character is never
described in terms of his color and
Dwayne was the best actor that we knew
from among our friends which is where we
cast that film the way we cast that film
and and so he did the part now
consciously we I resisted writing new
dialogue because he happened to be black
and just let it play when we just shot
the script as we started to shoot and
got into it you know we lived at that
farmhouse and said we were always into
raps about the you know implications and
the meaning and stuff like that so some
of that maybe crept into the film
but I think in both night and dawn the
biggest job that all of us had during
the production of both of those films
was doing rolling house thoughts because
those things can really interfere with
what you're doing and what you're doing
on the surface is making a comic book
so those ironies that you're talking
about are I think that selection process
is something again that happened that
script stage or on a consciousness level
somewhere beneath the craft of making
the film our news cameras have just
returned from covering such a Search and
Destroy operation against the ghouls the
motifs and metaphors trace back to the
screenplay stage why does the media play
such an important part in his film it's
been organized to search out and destroy
the marauding ghouls I work in
television so long that maybe it's just
an important part of my background I
also would just have a lot of attitudes
about what that reached you know that
whole communications electronic boxes so
I guess I tend to take chances the plan
is kill the brain and you kill the ghoul
I think the supply rygan chief chief
McClellan how's everything going
Oh things aren't going too bad men are
taking it pretty good you want to get on
the other side right over there chief do
you think we'll be able to defeat these
things well we killed 19 of them today
right in this area that was last three
we caught trying to claw their way into
an abandoned shit they must have thought
somebody was in there there wasn't no I
have people on the television not really
answering the question but making it
more confusing that's conscious that's
been the conscious part of that because
that's generally what it's about you
know ladies and gentlemen there was just
a plane crash it took out a small piece
of Manhattan more later you know it's
never reassuring or you know it's always
alarming and that's been a kind of
conscious through-line the producer is
in a key position during pre-production
securing funds putting the film into
viable financial and legal position and
thereafter protecting the director I
think that we tend to operate in more
european-style in terms of the way we
produce in the way George directs and
that we tend to follow serices auteur
theory of direction in that I see my
function as a producer in terms of
providing George Romero with a brush
palette in canvas and his creative
control is absolute in terms of the film
itself that he's the scriptwriter that
he's the director and that he's the
editor and it's totally the product of
one man's vision on a creative level
this is the largest budget that George's
had to work with in terms of production
and I think that he's got enough money
here to do what he wants to do okay it's
not an excessive amount of money by
traditional Hollywood standards this is
a low-budget picture of course anything
under two and a half million dollars is
considered low budget in terms of the
major studios
the biggest difference really well in
Don is working with a little bit of
money and still being satisfied with
with the product in fact it was easier I
mean I was paranoid about it upfront
because just having that extra weight
you know is a trip but I'm comfortable
with what Donna that is and the extra
money that it took to make it what it is
was really not a hindrance at all it was
a big big help you know a lot of people
say I can't work with money I can't work
with a lot of people around this film
was financed in somewhat of a
traditional way and that it's
co-financed internationally that a group
headed by Dario Argento in Italy Co
financed the film with us and our end of
the co financing comes from private
individuals but I think it was unique in
that this project started off with two
creative people getting together Dario
Argento and George Romero and then the
business side came after that point now
the physical production begins in this
second stage the director and
cinematographer stand to share equally
in importance for what is captured on
film
[Music]
it's the 8th week of the dawn shoot
we're in an 80 million dollar mall in
Pittsburgh which Romero is allowed to
use each night from 11:00 till 7:00 in
the morning everyone ready camera
[Applause]
[Applause]
he does not get uptight he asks me if
it's possible and asked me how much time
it's gonna take and then I'll give me a
straight yes or no on whether to do it
there's no bullshit there's no yelling
there's it's been a very for shoot this
long under these conditions I'd say it's
been absolutely wonderful George Romero
directs pretty much the way is pleasant
relaxed great sense of humor and
intelligence so the combinations work
well there's no hurry there's no
pressure we discuss it and usually have
very few words exchanged you know there
are ideas and a few words and we've got
it the man's like like water and your
ship so you just you know just float
along and do the job the best thing
about him is that he gets across what he
wants without telling you he I don't
know how he does it was incredible
because he's so clear about what he
wants all the time and I mean I think
like when he's working he's like editing
ants at the same time that when he says
it looks good I mean we've learned that
indeed it will look good because he has
a very good eye the atmosphere which
pervaded the dawn shoot was unusual for
a film production in this country and
while good films have been created by
directors who were universally despised
there's no doubt that chemistry counts I
think George likes confidence of course
and his crew but I think mainly likes to
work with people he feels ease with that
they have to be confident but beyond
that he likes he we can work with till 7
o'clock in the morning like we like we
did today and feel at ease with them you
know it's a lot of wrapping goes on
constantly on the shoots a lot of fun
you know yeah a lot of hard work
it's enjoyed working with George because
he you know he accepts a lot of input in
terms of what I see or you know it's
amazing there's even suggestions to come
often times from crew member
you know through me and he's very
willing to accept those those
observations and you know a lot of his
film is input from the crew a lot of
freedom it's a real democracy with
George the Don production took a month
off in December rather than remove and
restore the holiday decorations every
night losing hours of shooting time
Romero used that month to cut but he had
already shot by the time the school crew
arrived four weeks into the second round
of shooting he had covered the
screenplay well enough to stop at any
point and edit the footage in to release
form
it was now in an improvisational stage
where new ideas were being developed
this picture is really designed for
right now that's it's much more of a
comic book it's much like it didn't seem
so in the script
in fact the scene we saw being shot
yesterday at the firefighter
disappearance no and I've heard rumors
that the ending has been also changed
yeah in fact we shot both because I
wasn't willing to give up the tragic
ending but this film Dawn of the Dead
has a very has it's right it's very
romanticized film
[Music]
the major change that's happened that I
conceived from my conceptions of first
upon first reading it and now is that
it's it's lightening up you know when I
first read I thought it was awfully
shocking you know to think of just in
terms of numbers of bodies being named
and gallons of blood being spilt but
there's a quality coming out that is
counter waiting that it's definitely
becoming more of a fantasy to me and
more of an adventure to me then I first
conceived it from you know upon first
reading it well I think the number that
special effects are substantial portion
of the budget where prior to this they
were less so in George's other films
it's a number of explosions a number of
cosmetic effects that Tom Savini does
[Music]
all of those things take a certain
amount of time and a certain amount of
budgetary support in order to get them
to work they don't always work okay a
squib is it simply a detonator but we
placed a detonator in a tube that was
filled with gunpowder and that was
placed inside a prophylactic which was
filled with blood
so when the blast went off the
concussion began the blood from beneath
their clothing we're in this mall when
the mall closes the mall closes o 9:30
or so we start coming around 8 o'clock
to get set up and everything so we only
have like until 7:00 in the morning
before we have to start shooting because
we got to get all our stuff out in the
mall opens so that we times like a
particular night where we're shooting
all over the script so has to be done
fast because of that has begun like 7
hours you know
George is wonderful guy you can say to
George like he was said to be very cool
no expression on his face you could say
to hearing hi George I got this feathers
idea why don't we take a screwdriver I
say it maybe it's me it has a
screwdriver on his belt and have a
maintenance man zombie attacks
[Music]
[Applause]
[Music]
chuckles a screwdriver out of his bag
and sticks it into zombies he or it
shows it in the brain Georgia go okay
you can say Joy's however if we get
dragons coming out of the fountains in
the mall I'm sure you go okay you can't
shake him the first half of the shooting
was very organized it wasn't a great
deal of improvisation because most of
the big effects were done the first part
of the shoe the things that Joy's wrote
in the script you know we knew we
planned ahead he knew exactly we extend
around the office and he would walk the
whole thing through and be a zombie be
the victim be be the helicopter you know
Bree organized this shoots a little
different we've created characters on
her own you know like I've created a
character in friend of mine another
start man's created the character and
he's been developing those characters
within the like as we shoot day by day
so it's like really loose this half of
the shoot and just as much fun it
depends it depends on us on what's what
we're doing in the script you know some
nights we'll have 200 sometimes we'll
have five you know like we have five
other the concentrated scenes between
like a lead one lead and put five around
looks like you know a continuation of
the 200 the day before you know it
depends it like I said it depends on the
it what's in the what's on the script
for that night okay these are foam latex
latex appliance ticking on his face the
zombies are people that have died in
interesting ways they're not interesting
ways people have died and come back to
life a lot of them look like car
accident victims
cancer patients you know the one guy
came in here in a suit a three-piece
suit beautiful 3-piece suit so I made
him up like a mortician would either a
funeral upon and he was like beautiful
you know well over he made up you know
with lipstick and all that so he was
walking around like a freshman okay I
get to lean forward just the best I can
powder on this probably get a little of
your shirt here others are like people
who have been bitten by other zombies
who have died and become zombies and
they're the ones that are the grossest
what happened to you well
car accident zombie bit your face off or
something see the funnest thing is
inventing all the stuff I'm covering
them with our stuff called rubber mask
grease paint
it's a grease paint that has more glow
castor oil and keeps the rubber piece
from the drying out and changing color
after the makeup has been on it for a
while
you sculpt him in clay you make him bald
up and then you pour foam latex of the
mold you bake it in oven I took a big
photo tray and sculpted zillion wounds
cast them you know I had those and I did
another one cast them when I had those
woman so every now and then when I'm
making a piece and I have foam latex
leftover I'll pour it and worthy slabs
you know and we'll have some extra
wounds laying around
are there any schools that teach that no
I know they had to teach myself
the director must be a psychologist he
must also be a story boarder an editor
linking the disparate sensibilities of
cast and crew with his own vision okay
if it's straight up we can do it with
hands yeah Tom Savini now on the other
side of the camera is about to assay a
difficult stunt which will portray his
demise on screen one can see under these
specialized circumstances Romero
effortlessly fulfilling his ongoing
roles as prime mover of the production
okay bye you gotta go right there itself
yeah from here ready mine
the approach you're taking and directing
and I had thought that the mind of
Living Dead was pretty tightly still
imported it wasn't it wasn't a lot of
the sequences whereas a lot of the
sequences in this film because what
we've been here it seems very it's been
loose but glad you've been here only for
a few scenes to some of the some of the
some of the scenes as you watch the
interlock I think you'll find to be very
very close to the scene to the way that
it's written storyboarding refers most
commonly to a series of artist
renderings prepared in pre-production in
production each shot will correspond to
one of these sketches
George is a genius in that respect he
could memorize his own story boss he
prepares them himself and Chris's ad is
helped in that respect to me he doesn't
literally storyboard his shots you know
he's a very complex director and he
likes to keep it to himself in terms of
the actual storyboarding of blocking
scenes and he brings it with him to the
set you know that's his style there are
certain things that I want to happen
that build on each other
in this film the people starting to get
tempted and attracted by the mall and
starting to get or adopting their
military approach to taking it over and
those are the things that I tried to
keep as close as possible to the script
the sequence with when they go and get
the trucks and block off the outside of
the mall because there's a certain build
that was written into the script which I
really think adds to the overall flow of
the suspense of
[Music]
here in a later scene from Martin
Romero's modern vampire story one can
feel a tight pre structured quality
indicative of storyboarding I had a copy
of the script about a month and a half
or two before we started shooting and he
already had a storyboard to an extent
there's a lot of quick cuts you're
creeping down hallways and how would you
hit your mark emotionally I generally
didn't worry too much about it
emotionally I was more interested in
hitting the mark and being in the right
place
okay who are you oh my god haha let's
not get excited about this now that's no
reason to get upset when the scene is
very tightly blocked off
they weren't tightly blocked but they
were blocked because of it because of
being such an action an action scene you
know we had written blocking just as if
we would work in a theater of course
Martin was a small shoot generally not
more than eight people on the set in
total dawn and I think 35 and staff and
hundreds and actors yeah many nights
hundreds his attention was being pulled
away all too often so he kept himself
pretty much by himself during that but
his overall attitude with actors was
pretty much the same now your role in
dawn was on the other side of the camera
I was casting director mostly my job was
recruiting zombies creative compromise
is the name of the game in filmmaking
logistics of production force one to
make decisions counter to the original
concept but ultimately beneficial well
we were talking before about the fact
that when he got to the mall he it had a
different atmosphere than he already
thought about Don having the mall also
brought a futuristic look to the film it
was so fast the idea of the mall itself
the moment we see at the moment
come in and see what it is I think it's
gonna become obvious in terms of what
we're saying about the false security of
you know consumer society gets a great
benefit it's it's a great set to great
nation we couldn't do it without a mall
like this really lucky to get it how has
it been working with it it's great there
have been a few problems we've mainly
technical no real people problems when I
read it I could easily picture the
editing to be in your style you know
clean the anchors but I didn't picture
the color designs or what the mole
really look like all of those influences
everyone's attitude towards something as
well as my own desire thing to light
takes out the go warm pack adventure
[Music]
that's why you're dealing as I said with
you know three four hundred extras in
some scenes you're dealing with a
shopping mall is our primary set where
their primary business is in fact
selling consumer goods and integrating
what we want to do with the life of the
mall has been an arduous and complicated
task there is no way to pay or let's say
that there is but it's way beyond our
capacity to pay in dollar values what
the use of the mall is worth the people
that own the shopping mall had been
aesthetically attached to filmmaking and
they are getting enough money so that it
doesn't cost them anything to have us in
here which is an expensive proposition
in itself but if they in terms of
looking at it are they making a profit
on all being involved with them no
that's not the case insurance is a very
costly item in particularly where you're
dealing in public places if a little old
lady tends to see a zombie or happens to
see a zombie wandering around with
makeup and has a heart attack that's a
potential problem I don't want to limit
that the little old ladies but anyone so
yes the insurance tap on this particular
picture is a substantial number
obviously you can't light the place this
size without spending a week to light it
we discussed doing the whole thing in
one shot three person 30 days ready to
shoot it one day so we have to keep it
pretty low otherwise that there would be
really dead areas the situation is not
enough time not enough lights and
incredibly large spaces to deal with and
I think the large space is in the fact
that we're shooting a large number of
angles on any given shot or the biggest
problem we'll do a set up initial set up
and shoot one angle and the director
will immediately call for a reversal on
it now and normally that's not too big a
problem but in this case one reversal
might encompass Oh two or three hundred
feet of mall area where background just
to fill in just to create touches to
avoid the black holes hot spots is glass
everywhere creating reflections my first
reaction was total panic I aggravated
myself to death because I really wanted
it to be better
the initial shots was so big that I had
to use every light to its absolute
fullest amount I couldn't I couldn't
skip a couple of you know sections and
say oh I'll fill him in with another
light I mean I had to know that between
every 10 feet there had to be something
or every certain area that had to be a
highlight or a spot I had to know that
and I had to know exactly what it was
and I went back to my books and I read
performance figures on every lamp that I
have and measured things and we went
through it over and over again and
finally it came out we got the initial
setup done and it worked and I felt like
about five million pounds was taken off
my head
well we're swinging with it on the very
very very big shots right here right now
we're
tungsten we're pushing one stop and it's
working with the ease under that
situation for the very very big shots
we're pushing one again and using some
some zeiss statistic on lenses and with
the one for which there's plenty of life
is you don't so the whole basis of this
of this film for me is to go in and set
up areas set a main source of light and
that's not particularly a key light it's
a source of light whether it be a lamp
or a ceiling light or a window light
whatever it is and I sit back and I look
at what's there and build upon that a
lot of the situations are available like
because it's the only possible way to
shoot it the shots are either too large
or the movement is too fast to light
that's really the biggest problem is
this time situation we've managed by
doing basically area lighting by
bouncing a lot of light around creating
natural effects not lighting to the shot
but lighting areas let's go for one more
disco for just one more shot
and entire before watch play and then
just hope you can almost hold aiming
mode and you realize it was it again
like you see more of them coming around
okay
ready Mike
Sam 659 take seven seven 1343 I've never
working I have a director in terms of a
feature you know I know the reaction to
George's salad you know how you get so
many setups in one hour the other
directors might spend three or four
hours on a shot whereas George you know
I don't think you'd ever do that yeah we
have discussed angles and style a lot of
previous film we did called Martin look
pretty much maintained that mode when we
should be part of stuff which is a lot
of wide-angle low positions to
accentuate you know the monster aspects
the zombies or whatever
that's pretty much it in terms of any
adapted style which we have intensified
in this film or any previous horror
films which have done
this film allows us to be a little more
graceful and a little more beautiful
with our photography because it's not
simply a horror film in fact one of our
worries was we were getting a little too
far away from the horror genre but I can
help it along I understand what's going
work with him enough in Ireland I
understand his direction
George tends to set up scenes and then
let them happen rather than being
extremely extremely precise about every
movement that every actor and the
delivery of every line if he's not happy
with the way it comes out the first time
he will do another take obviously but I
think overall style wise I think that
it's consistent I think that it's a
little bit more traditional and that he
is using how could I say a more standard
approach in terms of reverses and two
shots on dialogue and the like not a lot
but somewhat well we shoot anywhere from
15 to 20 to 1
say noise please don't let me pass I
cover conversations with a master just
let me pass
I go up to seventh floor to find my
sister and then with single head shots
on everybody involved 1:07 will
devaluation how these are simple people
they have little but they do not give it
up easily and they're dead they give up
to no one not so much cut away no words
I'll cut through all of the people or
I'll use people as their own cutaways
Annie have died last week on these
threes in the basement of this building
we'll find them I have given them the
last rites no you do heart you will you
are stronger that boss well soon I think
maybe stronger with you and sometimes if
I see a shot I like I just go do it
almost done win we must stop the killing
the law
out here shooting I don't really think
too much about cutting I'd rather let
that happen to accept in tightly
choreographed sequences like the struck
scenes and so forth where I know what's
cutting to watch
[Music]
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in this action scene notice how he has
isolated the three leads to better
manipulate the visuals close-ups medium
shots long shot
[Applause]
[Music]
visceral disorienting angles rhythm and
tension potentials to be inherited by
himself on the editing table
[Music]
the most celebrated shot in night is
this one a close-up of one zombie gives
way to an extreme long shot of several
of them and the film transforms into a
vision of doom a revelation in space
multiplies the horror far beyond our
expectations as a spatial stylist Romero
is consistent he's a master of spatial
design yeah I never really put it down
to the use of space except that's what
it is it has to do with again it's just
breaking from tradition I mean there are
ways that you're supposed to shoot that
involving screen direction and involving
you know a formal pattern eyes kind of
cutting which I just don't like I think
as part if the scene is a tension filled
scene or if it's a suspenseful scene or
a very active scene which is meant to
great everything should great
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matter how much you work with film it
never ceases to amaze me how different
it is once it's up there and you're
watching all your footage it's very hard
to translate when you're on the set you
can't imagine what its gonna look like
in two dimensions up there that big with
electronic amplification but I don't
think it's insecurity to say that well
I'm not sure how this is gonna work out
so I want to shoot it another way I mean
it's just exploration there's a lot of
films like watercolor there's a lot of
accidents and it's learning how to
control the accidents and that's where
you just need to keep doing a lot of
work
[Music]
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the key creative force in
post-production is the editor who in
this case also happens to be the
director there a few scenes like we do a
housing project scene where we raid this
housing project in the beginning and
there's this there a couple of families
in the apartments there that would come
and were throwing them out of the
housing project and various people are
killed and the way some of them are
killed just makes you go like that and I
saw some of the stuff being shot but the
scenes but when he put it together it
was hahaha it was a really to the sea I
couldn't believe it
you know yeah it's pretty powerful
definitely not boring
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it has been said that Romero doesn't
allow us to look at his shots rather his
cutting forces us to experience
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this is as true of nine
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as it is of Martin as it is of dawn
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considering that quick cutting will wear
an audience down emotionally it is
remarkable that he can maintain such a
level of tension in his films they
contain almost twice as many cuts as any
other directors he conceptualizes doing
takes exactly the movies and he's very
very efficient with his shots
some call it choppy or you know some
call it heavy had in terms of the
editorial staff
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[Applause]
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George's commercial background if you
will has set the tone for his cutting
that he has a commercial real that that
I think is slick is anybody out of New
York or Los Angeles Mellon Bank and US
Steel and Rockwell and Heinz and he used
to make very very slick 30-second
commercials and he learned the
discipline whereby you have to say
something very very quickly concisely
and get the message across the Calgon
story what happens when a Calgon
research team in their submarine are
reduced to micro size and sent on a
dangerous mission deep inside a washing
machine
engines reversed for captain with duck
we've got to find out what's on those
fibers trapped in the fibers of a giant
t-shirt the Calgon Ott's discover
secrets of grey know looking laundry
leftover detergent film the fibers are
covered and the Calgon you'll thrillers
Calgon dissolves the dirty leftover
detergent film working the gray is gone
the fibers are clean let's get out of
here I think I'm in love with you if
you're tired of dull detergent films and
grade-b washes thrilled to the Calgon
story that you're nearby family washing
machine this has been transposed into
his feature editing so that there is
very rarely a let-up in the action I
don't think there are many shots that
last 4 or 5 seconds on screen there are
not those long long camera moves
revolving around all George would do
would cut them up if Mike did them I
shoot a lot and because I know that I
can make the decisions later on the
cutting table and so I went up shooting
a lot of material that I fall in love
with and I really like and there's just
economically no room for it in the final
piece so it's it's harder and it's very
hard to be when I sit down and I say
okay here are ten scenes that I like
which two are the least needed it's
really that's a very difficult process
for me and I think that's where all your
bias comes in and all your emotions it's
very difficult it's a lot easier to edit
when you're a pro when you're writing
you know a lot of people that work with
really a formula in terms of when to use
the master when to go in and all that
and then then people will say that's
very shattering if you don't follow some
kind of a pattern or fear if there isn't
some kind of an expected cutting pace
that people can relax and get
comfortable with I don't think that's
true at all I don't think people notice
cuts or if they're well done if they're
not shattering or jarring you don't
notice them at all and there's a
sequence in Martin for example which
could have been just a murder sequence
it's longer as far as I thought I can't
believe that some of the actions are
very mundane dealing with the telephone
with all of those actions the matter
Hamlin gained become interesting when
you look at them in a certain way
they're all part of the overall action
that's going on and they all helped to
build circa mental suspense because
there are things that we deal with every
day
I don't like sloughing sequences off you
know I don't like car chases that don't
do anything yeah you know because within
you know a little a fight in this room
that encompasses like three punches
being thrown I'm not talking about a big
brawl I could you know you could you
could do a three punch fight and make it
last five minutes you know is
everything's valid and everything is
information and I'd like to deal with
detail and I'd like to just go with a
visual you know almost a kind of cubist
look at that and that's another place
where I'll just shoot a film
I use a lot of sound elements and I cut
rather than on a flatbed on a table with
a synchronizer and there's a certain
kind of tactile thing that I get into in
terms of the tracks it's a visual almost
checkerboarding of the tracks no I don't
use film as leader I always use white
because I'd like to see that white Brown
juxtaposition of the tracks and I like
them lay the tracks across on the table
you can almost visualize them how the
track is working and I use a lot of
track and I cut when I do my first cut I
don't just cut picture voice I cut with
some kind of music and with effects and
rather you use pre-recorded music light
to get that yeah rhythm yeah to get to
get some kind of rhythm going until I
find everything going and then I you I
wind up with a lot of tracks I mean for
a small independent stuff I mean I've
seen studio productions where they get
into you know 30 40 tracks but that's
just because they're too lazy you lay
them in sometimes but I use up too I use
12 to 15 tracks and I like a lot of
sound I just I hate dead dead air I
always use some kind of an ambience or a
lot of music which is just all form
stuff some people say that the my tracks
are too driving or too full but that's
just personal preference
in summary this sequence from dawn
clearly demonstrates Romero style
conceptualized in the screen blazed a
given substance during shooting and
given shape in the edit
[Music]
[Music]
and we don't make distribution
arrangements till after we finish a
picture not wanting to have too many
things in the pie too soon not wanting
to compromise from ground zero
eventually we may have to make some
compromises on a business level but at
least they start later and we finished
the picture so it's a matter of maybe
taking something out this statement was
made during production and carried with
it an ominous note which Weaver berated
for over a years Romero fought for his
version of the film
a strong vision that stood as a thorn in
the side of negotiations with
distributors even after dawn opened to
tremendous business in Europe finally a
breakthrough was achieved we made a
couple of errors in signing the
distribution deal with with Night of the
Living Dead in that we sold or we signed
a distribution deal worldwide we didn't
hold out any rights television Canada
Europe Europe nothing 16-millimeter
nothing we we gave the distributor the
world basically I didn't know anything
then about the business side of things
and about how to draw a contract now
knowing what I know now you you want to
ask for as many of those controls as you
can possibly get your hands on give a
smash hit film out in theatres your
16-millimeter rights are gonna be worth
a lot your television rights are gonna
be worth while right so principally I
would say that hold out for as much as
you can hold out for there were a number
of people that offered us substantial
amounts of money to deliver an r-rated
film which meant we anticipated cutting
the guts out of the movie in order to
get that or we looked for a distributor
who recognized as we did that the best
economic course of action was to leave
the film untampered even though that
created other problems it created the
potential problem of the newspaper not
taking the ad it created the problem of
a a TV station not running a commercial
a certain theater not playing the film
we believe that ultimately economically
those problems would cost less and we
would make more if the film was left as
George wanted it several of the
distributors that wanted it badly
understanding the problems for example
with the MPA
here in this country that the MPAA would
probably either would probably Ex the
film and the only way to get an R would
be to cut it so I wound up holding out
during the negotiations and luckily and
Richard backed me up all the way on this
because there were there were a couple
of times when it would have been easier
to take a deal mm-hmm
would have been financially easier to
take a deal all right and that's the
other thing I think that the Richard and
I have had a good relationship that way
so you know I don't have to worry about
my own internal team that's that's big
number one
but having Richard support I was just
able to sit there and say look I'm not
gonna cut the picture when the
distributor took his stance to put the
picture out unrated it's not that he
wasn't accepting the restrictions of an
X because he's putting a flag on it that
says that you know one on the seventeen
will be admitted forget with that with a
parent not at all and he's accepting
those restrictions what he's not
accepting is the symbol itself the X
because the X does automatically say to
most people in America that this picture
is obscene for a major company in the
industry to release the film without a
rating is a major break and that's was
something that was long and hard in
pointing we basically are in agreement
with a system which Flags movies and
tells people what they're gonna see our
point is that should not be economic
penalties attached to that but then I
also had to fight and you always have to
fight for things like length usually
with an exploitation picture a
distributor will say it's terrific and I
love it but cut it to 90 minutes hmm
once again there's no secret I can't
teach you how to get the kind of
controls that enable you to leave your
picture longer or to have that kind of
creative cut it's a matter of just
holding up for it and not selling until
somebody gives it to you and I was able
to do that partially because of my
reputation but partially just because I
sat there and said no yeah and there
were a couple of sticky times when
people would get up from the negotiating
table and walk and go home and you got
to sit through those are the toughest
times you gotta just sit through that
and say okay we'll see you tomorrow
hopefully and we did see him tomorrow
and they ultimately said they're okay
can be your cut I don't let me give you
something on audio you might want to use
yes okay keep it going just roll first
all right I think that there are very
few there
that have total final real last cut on
their movies I say that when they tell
you that these are the rules for the
system and you can't do it another way
they're not correct it can be done other
ways you can maintain control of your
product
I'm not saying it's easy but it can be
done don't have to be in New York or
Hollywood in order to produce films to
get attention okay I think we're the
proof of that and I would be as
encouraging as possible people
to do what everybody else says you can't
do
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[Music]
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[Applause]
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[Applause]
[Music]
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[Applause]
[Music]
[Applause]
[Music]
[Music]
so night eleven there's the the
beginning and this is the end this is
the middle plenty of room for more
economies are still down
[Music]
[Music]
you

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night of the living dead

  1. Dawn of the Dead (1978) ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
  2. Dawn of the Dead (2004) ⭐⭐⭐⭐
  3. Land of the Dead (2005) ⭐⭐⭐
  4. Night of the Living Dead (1990) ⭐⭐⭐
  5. Day of the Dead (1985) ⭐⭐
  6. Day of the Dead (2008) ⭐⭐
  7. Night of the Living Dead (1968) ⭐
  8. Day of the Dead: Bloodline (2018) ⭐
  9. Diary of the Dead (2007) ⭐
  10. Survival of the Dead (2009) ⭐

Personal Note: I have two very controversial opinions regarding horror films. Not liking the original Night of the Living Dead film is one of them.

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one of my proudest moments was when I
was in a costume contest and on the
forum it asked for the name of your
character I was coming back EULA and it
asked what franchise are you from well I
was a universal monster
what is the universal monster you may
ask well it's Dracula Frankenstein the
mummy the Invisible Man the Bride of
Frankenstein ghost man
the Phantom of the Opera and The
Creature from the Black Lagoon there's
some other minor ones too but these are
the main eight I started watching these
movies when I was little I can even then
I knew there was something special about
them and his different is Dracula was
from the creature there's something that
connects them all and makes them stand
out what's all other movie monsters I'd
like to share with you what I think it
is and explain what is a universal
monster fittingly I have narrowed it
down to 13 main characteristics number
one there are monster from a horror
movie made by Universal Studios anywhere
from the 1920s through the 1950s number
two they're in black and white now the
one exception is the 1943 Phantom of the
Opera remake but the original is really
their definitive version because we
associate black and white is being old
it gives them a haunting quality as if
you found the film in a haunted house
now I'm black and white the lighting
plays a bigger role in creating mood and
it makes these monsters look more
mysterious as if they're permanent
in the shadows and because you're not
distracted by color it makes her other
qualities stand out more
Bailey's eyes were blue but all you see
other piercing quality which makes them
more like a vampire and the void of
color Boris's eyes seem less alive and
more like a living corpse the black and
white makes you believe these actors are
really supernatural characters they're
based on a book or myth Mary astonishing
creature if you have written the palace
by blood and by a secret
no wonder Marie has refused to publish
the book he says the written shot it
will be published I think the publishers
did that see my purpose was to write a
moral lesson the punishment would be
fell on a mortal man who dared to
emulate God whatever the purpose may
have been my dear I think great rich and
separate rule over my Dracula
Frankenstein the Phantom of the Opera
and the missile man are all based on
books and I love that story for the
bride comes from the Frankenstein book
too so they already have the death and
complex themes the characters from
classical literature naturally have and
we're already beloved by readers for
decades however the mythology behind
those monsters has been fascinating
people for centuries Mary Shelley
referred to Frankenstein as a modern
retelling of the Greek myth Prometheus
and you could see inspiration from the
Jewish myth The Golem the man made out
of clay that comes to life according to
film historian David's Kyle
there has been no civilization that
hasn't had a vampire myth or at least
something's similar to a vampire stories
of werewolves and invisibility go back
to ancient Greece with the story of Zeus
turning heel I see him into a wolf and
the helmet of Hades which turned Percy
is invisible and stories of sea monsters
are just as ancient and widespread so
there's a universal appeal to these
monsters which has spanned cultures and
centuries now the mummy of course takes
ideas r18
an apology but was also directly
inspired by the then recent myth of the
curse of King Tut's tomb which came
about during the 1922 excavation in the
mummy writer yael bole erson who was a
reporter covering that case we have
clearcoat misses
now I know that may sound lame but I'm
gonna explain why it's awesome
then Helsing learned what we have
learned it would be rare for you to
return to your own country I prefer to
rename and protect those whom you would
destroy who are today my blood now flows
through her veins she shall live through
the centuries to come as I have you here
you escape us Dracula we know how to
save miss Mina's soul if not her life if
she dies by day but I shall see that she
dies by night I will have Carfax Abbey
torn down stone by stone excavated a
mile around I shall find your earth box
and drive that stake through your heart
come here come here
nerville is strong van helsing more
Wolfgang more effective
my girls operated across Frankenstein
doesn't do so have a fire and they even
came up with this little figure of Isis
to fight against the mummy these
monsters are so powerful they can wipe
out everyone but this gives the human of
fighting chance which makes it more
suspenseful is the monster gonna get
them or not when Dracula first came out
it meant Helsing stopped Dracula with
the cross the audience person - applause
that's how exciting it was now it may
seem like these monsters go down easy
silver kills the Wolfman a wooden stake
for Dirac but monsters always died the
end of their movies so at least this is
laid out for you it makes sense as
opposed to some of the ways they kill
Freddy Krueger in the Nightmare on Elm
Street films so I think this gives it a
more satisfying conclusion they have a
unforgettable appearance when I was
little what made me want to watch these
movies was how the monsters looked on
the videotape box and what horror fan
doesn't love a great scary makeup this
tradition began with lon chaney
who always did his own makeup and was
known as the man of a thousand faces and
his phantom makeup is still horrifying
almost a hundred years later
you
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you
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after long left universal and died in
1930 makeup artist Jack Pierce became
the studio's monster maker an even long
son Lon Chaney jr. who didn't like Jack
Pierce compared his work to his fathers
Jack he was basic materials like spirit
gum cotton collodion grease paint and
occasionally yak hair and sometimes
would spend up to eight hours layering
and building it up we create a
Frankenstein the bride the mummy and the
Wolfman for his masterpiece Jack
utilized Boris's bone structure took
ideas from Boris Karloff and ideas from
the director James Whale and combined
them with his own he came up with the
square forehead because he felt the dr.
Frankenstein being an untrained surgeon
would take the easiest route and cut
straight through the skull and make it
like a lid where he takes the old brain
out and put in the new one by the late
40s Jack's preferred methods were
becoming out-of-date the universal sadly
fired him so the more prestigious but
Westmore and his team did the final
monster The Creature from the Black
Lagoon
now Dracula doesn't have an elaborate
makeup like Frankenstein but his costume
is just as iconic the Africa manager
actor and writer Hamilton Dean came up
with the cape and tuxedo for his Dracula
play which was a major influence on the
movie and the medallion which was a
combination of a Turkish coin and the
Ottoman medal of merit award was created
specifically for the film now the credit
for the appearance or lack thereof of
the Invisible Man
goes to John Bolton the special effects
doctor he was the early version of green
screen for the invisibility effects and
they still hold up today just like the
makeups and costumes get really cool
billing in the opening credits Universal
is actually the first studio to give
actors on screen credit so they were
experts of this first of all there the
title character so when you see the box
or the poster you know they're the star
now I know what you're gonna say but
Universal unofficially named him
Frankenstein the Peggy Webb l'm play
which was a major influence under
film named him Frankenstein plus there's
no way that Evan Costello Meet
Frankenstein was about meeting doctor in
the credits Bay Lugosi plays Count
Dracula which is more dignified than
just Dracula for Frankenstein Boris
Karloff is billed as question mark
making it more mysterious and spooky
when I was little that made my
imagination run away I even wondered if
they cast a real monster then Boris
Karloff became a horror superstar so for
the Bride of Frankenstein it's just
Carla which makes the actor himself son
exciting and scary an Elsa Lanchester is
billed as question mark for the monsters
made but in the neat twist she actually
gets credit for her other role in the
movie Mary Shelley for the Invisible Man
Claude Rains as credit has the invisible
one in quotation marks which is cute and
campy and fits the movies dark humor
tone for the Wolfman they actually show
little clips of the actors in the
opening credits and they save one change
jr. for last you know he's the Wolfman
but they keep you in suspense by not
revealing the makeup and finally the
creature doesn't get any on-screen
credit which goes back to Frankenstein
where it's more mysterious is it a real
Gillman playing the part doing their
billing this way
pumps you up to see them plus it makes
the actors themselves more mysterious
and more monstrous figures for American
audiences they all come from foreign
countries your pardon I just like watch
these and purchase these movies really
got going during the Great Depression
and in those days people went to the
movies sort of mentally escaped the real
world this my musicals were so popular
then and these monsters did the same
thing Dracula's from Transylvania
Frankenstein and his bride or from
Germany the MS old man's from England
the mummies from Egypt the Phantom's
from Paris the creatures from the Amazon
River and the Wolfman is from this
little European village and they keep it
so ambiguous you don't even know what
country it is
in those days you couldn't just
instantly Google a picture of
Transylvania so for most people these
countries were these exotic romanticized
places found only in their imaginations
or at the movies Bailey Lugosi Boris
Karloff and Claude Rains were all
European so they had his enchanting
accents that just transported you to
this dark fairytale world now nowadays
we can Google that all of these
countries really look like but because
the atmosphere is so strong the
characters are so timeless and because
are all filmed at Universal Studios
they still transport you to the other
world each actor or actress puts their
heart and soul into their character and
gives one of the greatest performances
of their entire career Joan Crawford
described lon Cheney as a man mesmerised
into his Park when he acted as if as if
God were working with the Phantom he
conveyed sadistic cunning and heartbreak
with just his facial expressions and
body language with him
you forget you're watching in silent
movie because he doesn't need words now
there has never but an actor so born to
play a role is Bale Lugosi was born to
play Count Dracula he was born in
Hungary close to Transylvania and could
see Vlad Dracula's castle from his house
before the movie he had played Dracula
almost a thousand times on stage and in
his words kept himself worked up to a
fever pitch and would sit in his
dressing room and take on as nearly as
possible the actual attributes of the
horrible vampire Dracula did the role
depression very much
hunted me I often dreamed about that in
the morning when I woke up I was tight
yes according to him for the movie he
worked even more intensely than he did
on stage and he absolutely is Count
Dracula Boris Karloff actually got to
develop a character the monster spanning
two films Frankenstein and instructs
sequel the Bride of Frankenstein first
he's brand new to the world
Mike London's Chaney he's able to convey
fear menace and happiness without words
in the second one he adds me I mentioned
is betrayal an animal like aggression
the ability to speak and a greater
understanding of love and hate in the
world
she's live alive the Bride of
Frankenstein like others we've met Aviva
who knows at Athens we belong dead
ungenial jr. is also great and so
likeable and label is the kind hearted
but tortured soul Larry Talbot aka The
Wolfman these actors were proud of their
roles Forrest called the monster whose
very best friend
Ranjit a junior called The Wolfman his
baby and Bale the gozi named one of his
dogs Dracula and his son called their
house the Dracula house now out of all
these monster stars Claude Rains
probably had the most successful
mainstream career he was the first actor
to pay the million dollars but no role
highlighted his magnificent voice the
Williams old man did Elsa Lanchester
became a horror icon with about 5
minutes of screen time as the bride and
his man in the suit as he could have
been rico browning use this unique
swimming style for the creature where he
really seemed like a gill man and it
almost 90 he's still going to horror
conventions they approached their roles
the same way he would approach playing a
hamlet and all of them became horror
icons because of it they have romantic
interests how's my spooky boo he this is
part of giving death to these characters
they don't want to be alone and it's
part of that fairy tale quality in the
documentary the opera ghost a phantom
unmasked Scott McQueen says if one theme
recurs in the Canon of Universal Studios
horror it is a timeless legend of Beauty
and the Beast Frankenstein the Phantom
of the Opera and The Creature from the
Black Lagoon I'll have a girl there in
love with but because they're so ugly
they're always rejected and you feel for
them now Acula is the opposite Bela
Lugosi was the innovator of a sexual
element of the character on the surface
he's handsome charming and lures women
in and by the time they realize he's the
Beast they're already under his spell in
the mummy Imhotep is in love with Helen
because she is the reincarnation of his
lost love an ox Naaman and his goal is
to make her remember her past life this
concept was later integrated in not only
mummy movies but many vampire movies as
well
now my favorite romance is actually with
the Invisible Man the formula that makes
him invisible also causes madness but he
loved us Flores so much that when he's
with her he tries to fight it off but
can't I knew you'd come to me flora I
wanted to come back to you my darling I
failed I'm Marilyn things a man must
leave alone
[Music]
monsters go after women but with them
it's part of the tragedy of their
characters and they'll never have the
love that they want they're outsiders
but also the character you identify with
these monsters look different from
everyone else they different from
everybody else and the people in town
are either afraid of them or trying to
kill them they have no hope of fitting
in but haven't we all at different times
of our lives
felt like we don't fit in and that's how
you can relate to these monsters now
when I was little I used to love to stay
up late so I wanted to be Dracula and I
love swimming so under the decree curse
I could swim all the time
and who hasn't thought about being
invisible kids seemed to instantly
identify Frankenstein as being like a
big child he's new to the world doesn't
understand the rules just like they are
and when they made the movie make Clark
who's an adult playing Elizabeth was
terrified of the makeup and Boris had to
keep ruling his little finger to remind
her that it's just Boris but Marilyn
Harris who played the little girl just
instantly bonded with Boris Karloff from
Frankenstein makeup Wolfman is another
one that's easy for kids to relate to
from everything I've learned about Lon
Chaney jr. he sounds like a big kid even
when they make ghost of Frankenstein he
bought the kids ice cream and I think
that's why he was so great at playing
Lennie in Of Mice and Men and it shines
through in this Larry Talbot you feel
that gentleness in the situation is very
kid-like too even though he's an adult
because part of the plot is him trying
to tell his dad he's a werewolf and his
dad not believing him now you'll see
this evil Dean who conjured up it's only
in your mind what you're gonna see with
me are you
I've got to go these people have a
problem you must make your own fight
what's said on this tonight dad take the
king with you we're on McCain please
just take it with you please
all right when you're 12 or 13 you could
even see the wolf change as a metaphor
for puberty I know I certainly could so
I was and still am able to see myself in
all of these monsters and I think that's
why I'm so attached to them they're easy
to imitate I used to love playing and
acting out as these monsters when I was
a kid and for doing these videos and
cosplaying this Dracula horror
conventions I still do it and anyone can
talk like the macula or walk I'm fine
it's a testament to how iconic these
monsters are that anyone could do the
movie if you haven't seen the movie and
it's a testament to how much personality
the actors brought to the roles now if
you're looking to do a brighter
Frankenstein
I suggest the hiss and the also ancestor
got the idea because her and her husband
Charles Laughton used to feed the geese
and if you got too close the geese would
go at you
these standout characteristics is part
of what makes the universal monster so
much fun
we have inspired other monsters have
been so many remakes re-imaginings oh my
geez and parodies of these movies so it
should become classics in your own right
and is different as some of the remakes
are they've all taken some inspiration
from the original the 20/20 version of
Dracula is charming and sexy which is
taking from Baio Lugosi however they've
also inspired original creations the
creator of the horror soap opera Dark
Shadows being Kurtis we inspired to
create Barnabas Collins because of how
scared he was available to go see when
he was a kid
there are shots and ideas and jaws are
almost identical to the creature from
Black Lagoon and the shape of water is a
romantic retelling of The Creature from
the Black Lagoon rocky from The Rocky
Horror Picture Show was inspired by
Frankenstein and Sally from The
Nightmare Before Christmas even has
scars like the bride but no novels
behind them the Wolfman and the mummy
have inspired whole subgenres of horror
stories there would be no monsters
there will be no Count von count nor
there be account shockula or a
Frankenberry so even breakfast wouldn't
be the same without the Universal
Monsters you always see them especially
around Halloween aside from The Wizard
of Oz I cannot think of another
live-action franchise from that era that
is still as much a part of our culture
as the Universal Monsters are the movies
are so regularly shown on TV on the
Svengoolie show there's a place sort of
near me called haunted trails that
hasn't prominently displayed and I've
even been to an arcade with a Creature
from the Black Lagoon pinball machine so
you can spot them here and there all
year round but they're really happening
during Halloween during last year's
Halloween Hot Topic sold a Dracula
bobblehead and bail ago Z's likeness
Walgreens had exclusive universal
monster action figures they're Universal
monsters on Halloween cards candy bags
they're universal monster Halloween
decorations and Halloween costumes and
there's even a universal monster haunted
house at Universal Studios just last
night I saw the movies prominently
displayed at Walmart I grew up in the
90s and I remember one year Burger King
had universal monster kids meal toys the
creature could even go in the bathtub
one year my mom got me universal monster
Valentine's cards and she even got me
the universal monster postage stamps
which was the first time I ever saw the
actors without makeup so Universal
monster isn't just a franchise it stands
for something and you may have points
that I missed but I think we all agree
enough ever someone deserves to be
called a classic movie monster it's
Dracula Frankenstein
the more me the Invisible Man the Bride
of Frankenstein the Wolfman the Phantom
of the Opera and The Creature from the
Black Lagoon I know I did that earlier
but a great cast is worth repeating
[Music]

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The following 72 films feature Frankenstein's monster:

Year Film
1910 Frankenstein
1915 Life Without Soul
1920 The Monster of Frankenstein
1931 Frankenstein
1933 Mickey's Gala Premier (short cartoon)
1935 Bride of Frankenstein
Hollywood Capers (short cartoon)
1938 Have You Got Any Castles? (short cartoon)
1939 Son of Frankenstein
1941 Hellzapoppin'
1942 The Ghost of Frankenstein
1943 Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man
1944 The House of Frankenstein
1945 House of Dracula
1948 Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein
1957 The Curse of Frankenstein
I Was a Teenage Frankenstein
1958 Frankenstein 1970
The Revenge of Frankenstein
1961 Franken-Stymied (short cartoon)
1964 The Evil of Frankenstein
Dr. Devil and Mr. Hare (short cartoon)
1965 Frankenstein Conquers the World
1966 The War of the Gargantuas
1967 Casino Royale
Frankenstein Created Woman
Mad Monster Party?
1969 Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed
1970 The Horror of Frankenstein
1971 Lady Frankenstein
1972 Mad Mad Mad Monsters
Frankenstein '80
1973 Flesh for Frankenstein
Blackenstein
Frankenstein
Frankenstein: The True Story
The Spirit of the Beehive
1974 Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell
Young Frankenstein
1976 Terror of Frankenstein
1984 Frankenstein
1985 The Bride
Fracchia vs. Dracula
1987 The Monster Squad
1988 Frankenstein General Hospital
Rowing with the Wind
Scooby-Doo! and the Reluctant Werewolf
1990 Frankenstein Unbound
Frankenhooker
1992 Frankenstein
1994 Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
1995 Monster Mash
1997 House of Frankenstein
The Creeps
1999 Alvin and the Chipmunks Meet Frankenstein
Rock 'N Roll Frankenstein
2004 Van Helsing
Frankenstein
2008 Igor
2009 House of the Wolf Man
Stan Helsing
2012 Frankenweenie
Hotel Transylvania
2013 Frankenstein's Army
2014 I, Frankenstein
2015 Frankenstein
Frankenstein vs. The Mummy
Hotel Transylvania 2
Victor Frankenstein
2018 Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation
2019 Depraved
Frankenstein's Monster's Monster, Frankenstein (short film)

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Name:
You are not the author of the timeline
Description:
Documents the major releases in American and European horror movie history

Type: Event
Name:
Zoopraxiscope
Description:
The first motion picture is captured using still images and rotating discs
Time: 1879 1 1
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Kinetoscope
Description:
Introduced the basic approach for all cinematic production
Time: 1889 1 1
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Movie Projector
Description:
The first public screening of a film
Time: 1895 12 28
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Haunted Castle
Description:
-Silent Black and White Monster Horror-
Directed by Georges Méliès
Produced by Georges Méliès
First horror film
First silent horror film
First vampire film
Time: 1896 5 27
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
Description:
-Silent Black and White German Expressionist Monster Horror-
Directed by Robert Weine
Produced by Rudolf Meinert, Erich Pommer
Introduced the Beauty and Beast trope
Time: 1920 2 26
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Description:
-Silent Black and White Monster Horror-
Directed by John S. Roberston
Produced by Adolph Zukor, Jesse L. Lasky
Time: 1920 3 18
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Technicolor
Description:
The first color film was demonstrated, serving for the foundation of future films
Time: 1921 2 21
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror
Description:
-Silent Black and White German Expressionist Monster Horror-
Directed by F.W. Murnau
Produced by Enrico Dieckmann, Albin Grau
Time: 1922 3 4
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
Description:
-Silent Black and White Romantic Monster Horror-
Directed by Wallace Worsley
Produced by Carl Laemmle
Time: 1923 9 2
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Phantom of the Opera
Description:
-Silent Black and White Monster Horror-
Directed by Rupert Julian
Produced by Carl Laemmle
Time: 1925 11 25
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Vitaphone
Description:
The first sound film is presented and becomes a smash hit
Time: 1927 2 10
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
London After Midnight
Description:
-Silent Black and White Mystery Monster Horror-
Directed by Tod Browning
Produced by Tod Browning
Most footage was lost in a fire in 1967
Time: 1927 12 3
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Dracula
Description:
-Black and White Pre-Code Monster Horror-
Directed by Tod Browning
Produced by Tod Browning
First sound horror film
Popularized the vampire
Time: 1931 2 12
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Frankenstein
Description:
-Black and White Pre-Code Science Fiction Monster Horror-
Directed by James Whale
Produced by Carl Laemmle Jr.
Considered one of the most influential horror movies of all time
Time: 1931 11 21
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Doctor X
Description:
-Technicolor Pre-Code Mystery Horror-
Directed by Michael Curtiz
Produced by Hal B. Wallis, Darryl F. Zanuck
Time: 1932 8 3 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Mummy
Description:
-Black and White Pre-Code Romantic Monster Horror-
Directed by Karl Freund
Produced by Carl Laemmle Jr.
Time: 1932 12 22
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Mystery of the Wax Museum
Description:
-Technicolor Pre-Code Mystery Horror-
Directed by Michael Curtiz
Produced by Henry Blanke, Hal B. Wallis
Time: 1933 2 18 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Black Cat
Description:
-Black and White Pre Code Horror-
Directed by Edgar G. Ulmer
Produced by E. M. Asher
Time: 1934 5 7
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Bride of Frankenstein
Description:
-Black and White Science Fiction Monster Horror-
Directed by James Whale
Produced by Carl Laemmle Jr.
Time: 1935 4 19
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Raven
Description:
-Black and White Pre Code Horror-
Directed by Lew Landers
Time: 1935 7 8
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Son of Frankenstein
Description:
-Black and White Science Fiction Monster Horror-
Directed by Rowland V. Lee
Produced by Rowland V. Lee
Time: 1939 1 13
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Mummy's Hand
Description:
-Black and White Monster Horror-
Directed by Christy Cabanne
Produced by Ben Pivar
Time: 1940 9 20
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941)
Description:
-Black and White Monster Horror-
Directed by Victory Fleming
Produced by Victor Saville
Time: 1941 8 12
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Wolf Man
Description:
-Black and White Monster Horror-
Directed by George Waggner
Produced by George Waggner
Time: 1941 12 12
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Mummy's Tomb
Description:
-Black and White Noir Monster Horror-
Directed by Harold Young
Produced by Ben Pivar
Time: 1942 10 23
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Cat People
Description:
-Black and White Monster Horror-
Directed by Jacques Tourneur
Produced by Val Lewton
First horror film to masterfully utilize sound and unseen imagery
Time: 1942 12 6
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Shadow of a Doubt
Description:
-Black and White Noir Psychological Horror-
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Produced by Jack H. Skirball
Time: 1943 1 12
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man
Description:
-Black and White Crossover Monster Horror-
Directed by Roy William Neill
Produced by George Waggner
First Monster Crossover Film
Sparked the Monster Mash series
Time: 1943 3 5
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
I Walked with a Zombie
Description:
-Black and White Horror-
Directed by Jacques Tourneur
Produced by Val Lewton
Time: 1943 4 21
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Mummy's Ghost
Description:
-Black and White Monster Horror-
Directed by Reginald Le Borg
Produced by Ben Pivar
Time: 1944 7 7
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Mummy's Curse
Description:
-Black and White Monster Horror-
Directed by Leslie Goodwins
Produced by Ben Pivar, Oliver Drake
Time: 1944 12 22
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
House of Frankenstein
Description:
-Black and White Crossover Monster Horror-
Directed by Erle C. Kenton
Produced by Paul Malvern
Time: 1945 2 16
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
House of Dracula
Description:
-Black and White Crossover Monster Horror-
Directed by Erle C. Kenton
Produced by Paul Malvern
Time: 1945 12 7
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Eastmancolor
Description:
Built off of Technicolor to produce colored films more efficiently
Time: 1950 1 1
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Day the Earth Stood Still
Description:
-Black and White Science Fiction Giant Monster Horror-
Directed by Robert Wise
Produced by Julian Blaustein
Time: 1951 9 18 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
House of Wax
Description:
-Eastmancolor 3D Mystery Horror-
Directed by Andre DeToth
Produced by Bryan Foy
First 3D feature in color
Time: 1953 4 10 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Creature from the Black Lagoon
Description:
-Black and White 3D Monster Horror-
Directed by Jack Arnold
Produced by William Alland
Considered to be last series in the Universal Monster Age
Time: 1954 2 12
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Rear Window
Description:
-Eastmancolor Mystery Horror-
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Produced by Alfred Hitchcock
Time: 1954 9 1
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Revenge of the Creature
Description:
-Black and White 3D Monster Horror-
Directed by Jack Arnold
Produced by William Alland
Time: 1955 3 23
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Beast with 1,000,000 Eyes
Description:
-Black and White Science Fiction Giant Monster Horror-
Directed by David Kramarsky, Lou Place, Roger Corman
Produced by David Kramarsky
Time: 1955 6 15
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Tarantula
Description:
-Black and White Science Fiction Giant Monster Horror-
Directed by Jack Arnold
Produced by William Alland
Time: 1955 11 23
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Phantom from 10,000 Leagues
Description:
-Black and White Science Fiction Giant Monster Horror-
Directed by Dan Milner
Produced by Dan Milner, Jack Milner
Time: 1955 12 1
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Man Who Knew Too Much
Description:
-Eastmancolor Noir Horror-
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Produced by Alfred Hitchcock
Time: 1956 6 1
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
It Conquered the World
Description:
-Black and White Science Fiction Giant Monster Horror-
Directed by Roger Corman
Produced by Roger Corman
Time: 1956 6 15
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Attack of the Crab Monsters
Description:
-Black and White Science Fiction Giant Monster Horror-
Directed by Roger Corman
Produced by Roger Corman
Time: 1957 2 10
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Curse of Frankenstein
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Terence Fisher
Produced by Anthony Hinds
First colored horror film
Had a huge contemporary impact
Time: 1957 5 2
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Horror of Dracula
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Terence Fisher
Produced by Anthony Hinds
Time: 1958 5 8
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Vertigo
Description:
-Eastmancolor Noir Psychological Horror-
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Produced by Alfred Hitchcock
Time: 1958 5 9
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Revenge of Frankenstein
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Terence Fisher
Produced by Anthony Hinds
Time: 1958 6 1
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Creature Walks Among Us
Description:
-Black and White Monster Horror-
Directed by Jack Arnold
Produced by William Alland
Time: 1958 7 9
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
It! The Terror from Beyond Space
Description:
-Black and White Science Fiction Monster Horror-
Directed by Edward L. Cahn
Produced by Robert Kent, Edward Small
Time: 1958 8 13 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Tingler
Description:
-Black and White 4D Monster Horror-
Directed by William Castle
Produced by William Castle
Time: 1959 1 1
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
House on Haunted Hill
Description:
-Black and White 4D Supernatural Horror-
Directed by William Castle
Produced by William Castle, Robb White
Time: 1959 2 17
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
North by Northwest
Description:
-Eastmancolor Horror-
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Produced by Alfred Hitchcock
Time: 1959 7 28
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Attack of the Giant Leeches
Description:
-Black and White Science Fiction Monster Horror-
Directed by Bernard L. Kowalski
Produced by Gene Corman, Roger Corman
Time: 1959 10 1
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Wasp Woman
Description:
-Black and White Science Fiction Monster Horror-
Directed by Roger Corman, Jack Hill
Produced by Roger Corman
Time: 1959 11 2
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Psycho
Description:
-Black and White Psychological Slasher Horror-
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Produced by Alfred Hitchcock
First slasher film
Time: 1960 3 22
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
House of Usher
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Roger Corman
Produced by Roger Corman
Had a huge contemporary impact
Time: 1960 6 18
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Brides of Dracula
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Terence Fisher
Produced by Anthony Hinds
Time: 1960 7 7
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Pit and the Pendulum
Description:
-Technicolor Horror-
Directed by Roger Corman
Produced by Roger Corman
Time: 1961 8 12
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Raven (1963)
Description:
-Eastmancolor Comedy Horror-
Directed by Roger Corman
Produced by Roger Corman
Time: 1963 1 25
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Haunted Palace
Description:
-Eastmancolor Horror-
Directed by Roger Corman
Produced by Samuel Z. Arkoff, James H. Nicholson, Roger Corman
Time: 1963 12 31
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Evil of Frankenstein
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Freddie Francis
Produced by Anthony Hinds
Time: 1964 5 8
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Masque of the Red Death
Description:
-Eastmancolor Horror-
Directed by Roger Corman
Produced by Roger Corman, George Willoughby
Time: 1964 6 24
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Tomb of Ligeia
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Roger Corman
Produced by Samuel Z. Arkoff, Pat Green
Time: 1964 12 6
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Dracula: Prince of Darkness
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Terence Fisher
Produced by Anthony Nelson Keys
Time: 1966 1 9
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Frankenstein Created Woman
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Terence Fisher
Produced by Anthony Nelson Keys
Time: 1967 3 15
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Night of the Living Dead
Description:
-Black and White Zombie Horror-
Directed by George A. Romero
Produced by Russell W. Streiner, Karl Hardman
First horror film to star an African American actor
First film to masterfully utilize gore
Popularized the zombie
Time: 1968 10 1
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Dracula Has Risen from the Grave
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Freddie Francis
Produced by Aida Young
Time: 1968 11 7
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Terence Fisher
Produced by Anthony Nelson Keys
Time: 1969 2 11
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Mark of the Devil
Description:
-Eastmancolor Shocksploitation Horror-
Directed by Michael Armstrong
Produced by Adrian Hoven
Time: 1970 2 19
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Peeping Tom
Description:
-Eastmancolor Psychological Thriller Slasher Horror-
Directed by Michael Powell
Produced by Michael Powell
Time: 1970 4 7 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Taste the Blood of Dracula
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Peter Sasdy
Produced by Aida Young
Time: 1970 5 7
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Scars of Dracula
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Roy Ward Baker
Produced by Aida Young
Time: 1970 11 8
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Night of the Lepus
Description:
-Eastmancolor Science Fiction Monster Horror-
Directed by William F. Claxton
Produced by A.C. Lyles
Time: 1972 7 16
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Last House on the Left
Description:
-Eastmancolor Shocksploitation Horror-
Directed by Wes Craven
Produced by Sean S. Cunningham
Time: 1972 8 30
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Dracula A.D. 1972
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Alan Gibson
Produced by Michael Carreras, Josephine Douglas
Time: 1972 12 10
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Satanic Rites of Dracula
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Alan Gibson
Produced by Roy Skeggs, Don Houghton
Time: 1973 11 3
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Exorcist
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Horror-
Directed by William Friedkin
Produced by William Peter Blatty
Deemed the scariest movie in history
Popularized the supernatural sub-genre
Time: 1973 12 26
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Terence Fisher
Produced by Roy Skeggs
Time: 1974 5 2
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre
Description:
-Eastmancolor Shocksploitation Slasher Horror-
Directed by Tobe Hooper
Produced by Kim Henkel, Tobe Hooper, Jay Parsley, Richard Saenz
Considered to be the greatest shocksploitation horror film
Time: 1974 10 1
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Jaws
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Steven Spielberg
Produced by Richard D. Zanuck, David Brown
First American film to make $100,000,000 in box office
Time: 1975 6 20
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Exorcist II: The Heretic
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Horror-
Directed by John Boorman
Produced by John Boorman, Richard Lederer
Time: 1976 6 17 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Hills Have Eyes
Description:
-Eastmancolor Horror-
Directed by Wes Craven
Produced by Peter Locke
Time: 1977 7 22 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Within the Woods
Description:
-Eastmancolor Short Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Sam Raimi
Produced by Sam Raimi
Time: 1978 1 1 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Jaws 2
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Jeannot Szwarc
Produced by David Brown, Richard D. Zanuck
Time: 1978 6 16
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Dawn of the Dead
Description:
-Eastmancolor Zombie Horror-
Directed by George A. Romero
Produced by Richard P. Rubinstein
Time: 1978 9 1 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Halloween
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by John Carpenter
Produced by Debra Hill
Introduced one of the most recognizable horror musical scores
Highest grossing independent film of all time
Popularized the Slasher subgenre
Time: 1978 10 25 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
I Spit on Your Grave
Description:
-Eastmancolor Shocksploitation Revenge Horror-
Directed by Meir Zarchi
Produced by Meir Zarchi, Joseph Zbeda
Time: 1978 11 22
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Alien
Description:
-Eastmancolor Science Fiction Monster Slasher Horror-
First horror film to masterfully utilize claustrophobic settings
First slasher film set in space
Time: 1979 5 25 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Cannibal Holocaust
Description:
-Eastmancolor Found Footage Shocksploitation Horror-
Directed by Ruggero Deodato
Produced by Franco Di Nunzio, Franco Palaggi
First found footage horror film
Controversial for its graphic volume of violence
Time: 1980 2 7 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Friday the 13th
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Sean S. Cunningham
Produced by Sean S. Cunningham
Time: 1980 5 9 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
City of the Living Dead
Description:
-Eastmancolor Zombie Horror-
Directed by Lucio Fulci
Produced by Lucio Fulci, Giovanni Masini, Robert E. Warner
Time: 1980 8 11
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Friday the 13th Part II
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Steve Miner, Sean S. Cunningham
Produced by Steve Miner
Popularized the camp setting
Introduced one of the most recognizable horror icons of all time
Time: 1981 4 30 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Evil Dead
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Action Comedy Horror-
Directed by Sam Raimi
Produced by Robert Tapert
Masterfully balanced horror, action, and comedy
Time: 1981 10 15
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Halloween II
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Rick Rosenthal
Produced by Debra Hill, John Carpenter
Time: 1981 10 30 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Friday the 13th Part 3: 3D
Description:
-Eastmancolor 3D Slasher Horror-
Directed by Steve Miner
Produced by Frank Mancuso Jr.
Time: 1982 8 13 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Pieces
Description:
-Eastmancolor Shocksploitation Slasher Horror-
Directed by Juan Piquer Simón
Produced by Stephen Minasian, Dick Randall, Edward L. Montoro
Time: 1982 8 23
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Halloween III: Season of the Witch
Description:
-Eastmancolor Science Fiction Horror-
Directed by Tommy Lee Wallace
Produced by Debra Hill, John Carpenter
Time: 1982 10 22 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Psycho II
Description:
-Eastmancolor Psychological Slasher Horror-
Directed by Richard Franklin
Produced by Hilton A. Green, Bernard Schwartz
Time: 1983 6 3 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Jaws 3-D
Description:
-Eastmancolor 3D Monster Horror-
Directed by Joe Alves
Produced by Rupert Hitzig
Time: 1983 7 22
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Joseph Zito
Produced by Frank Mancuso Jr.
Time: 1984 4 13 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Hills Have Eyes Part II
Description:
-Eastmancolor Horror-
Directed by Wes Craven
Produced by Barry Cahn, Jonathan Debin, Peter Locke
Time: 1984 6 1 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
A Nightmare on Elm Street
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Wes Craven
Produced by Robert Shaye
Time: 1984 11 4 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Night of the Comet
Description:
-Eastmancolor Science Fiction Horror Comedy-
Directed by Thom Eberhardt
Produced by Andrew Lane, Wayne Crawford
Time: 1984 11 16
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Little Shop of Horrors
Description:
-Eastmancolor Rock Musical Monster Horror Comedy-
Directed by Frank Oz
Produced by David Geffen
Time: 1984 12 16
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Friday the 13th: A New Beginning
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Danny Steinmann
Produced by Timothy Silver
Time: 1985 3 22 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Day of the Dead
Description:
-Eastmancolor Zombie Horror-
Directed by George A. Romero
Produced by Richard P. Rubinstein
Time: 1985 6 30 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy's Revenge
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Jack Sholder
Produced by Robert Shaye
Time: 1985 11 1 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Psycho III
Description:
-Eastmancolor Psychological Slasher Horror-
Directed by Anthony Perkins
Produced by Hilton A. Green
Time: 1986 7 2 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Aliens
Description:
-Eastmancolor Science Fiction Monster Action Horror-
Directed by James Cameron
Produced by Gale Anne Hurd
Time: 1986 7 18 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Tom McLoughlin
Produced by Don Behrns
Time: 1986 8 1 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Night of the Creeps
Description:
-Eastmancolor Science Fiction Zombie Horror Comedy-
Directed by Fred Dekker
Produced by Charles Gordon
Time: 1986 8 22
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror Comedy-
Directed by Tobe Hooper
Produced by Menahem Golan, Yoram Globus
Time: 1986 8 22
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Chuck Russell
Produced by Robert Shaye
Time: 1987 2 27 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Evil Dead II
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Comedy Horror-
Directed by Sam Raimi
Produced by Robert Tapert, Alex De Benedetti, Irvin Shapiro
Time: 1987 3 13 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Monster Squad
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Comedy Horror-
Directed by Fred Dekker
Produced by Jonathan A. Zimbert
Time: 1987 7 4
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Bates Motel
Description:
-Eastmancolor Comedy Horror-
Directed by Richard Rothstein
Time: 1987 7 5 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Jaws: The Revenge
Description:
-Eastmancolor Monster Horror-
Directed by Joseph Sargent
Produced by Joseph Sargent
Time: 1987 7 17
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Hellraiser
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Body Horror-
Directed by Clive Barker
Produced by Christopher Figg
Time: 1987 9 10 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by John Carl Buechler
Produced by Iain Paterson
Time: 1988 5 13 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Renny Harlin
Produced by Robert Shaye, Rachel Talalay
Time: 1988 8 19 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Dwight H. Little
Produced by Paul Freeman
Time: 1988 10 21 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Child's Play
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Tom Holland
Produced by David Kirschner
Time: 1988 11 9 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Hellbound: Hellraiser II
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Body Horror-
Directed by Tony Randel
Produced by Christopher Figg, David Barron
Time: 1988 12 23 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Friday the 13th Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Rob Hedden
Produced by Randy Cheveldave
Time: 1989 7 28 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Stephen Hopkins
Produced by Robert Shaye, Rupert Harvey
Time: 1989 8 11 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Dominique Othenin-Girard
Produced by Rick Nathanson, Ramsey Thomas
Time: 1989 10 13 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Jeff Burr
Produced by Robert Engelman
Time: 1990 1 12
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Child's Play 2
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by John Lafia
Produced by David Kirschner
Time: 1990 11 9 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Psycho IV: The Beginning
Description:
-Eastmancolor Psychological Slasher Horror-
Directed by Mick Garris
Time: 1990 11 10 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Child's Play 3
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Jack Bender
Produced by Robert Latham Brown
Time: 1991 8 30 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Rachel Talalay
Produced by Michael De Luca, Michael N. Knue, Robert Shaye, Aron Warner
Time: 1991 9 13 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Alien 3
Description:
-Eastmancolor Science Fiction Monster Slasher Horror-
Directed by David Fincher
Produced by Gordon Carroll, David Giler, Walter Hill
Time: 1992 5 22 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Braindead
Description:
-Eastmancolor Splatstick Zombie Horror Comedy-
Directed by Peter Jackson
Produced by Jim Booth
Considered to be the peak of gore in horror movies
Time: 1992 8 13
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Body Horror-
Directed by Anthony Hickox
Produced by Lawrence Mortorff
Time: 1992 9 11 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Leprechaun
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Comedy Slasher Horror-
Directed by Mark Jones
Produced by Jeffrey B. Mallian
Time: 1993 1 8 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Army of Darkness
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Comedy Action Horror-
Directed by Sam Raimi
Produced by Robert Tapert
Time: 1993 2 19 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Adam Marcus
Produced by Sean S. Cunningham, Debbie Hayn-Cass
Time: 1993 8 13 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Leprechaun 2
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Comedy Slasher Horror-
Directed by Rodman Flender
Produced by Donald P. Borchers, Mark Amin, Mark Jones, Michael Prescott
Time: 1994 4 8 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Wes Craven's New Nightmare
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Wes Craven
Produced by Marianne Maddalena
Time: 1994 10 14 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Leprechaun 3
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Comedy Slasher Horror-
Directed by Brian Trenchard-Smith
Produced by Mark Amin, Bill Berry, Jeff Geoffray, Walter Josten, Henry Seggerman
Time: 1995 6 27 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Joe Chappelle
Produced by Paul Freeman
Time: 1995 9 29 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Mind Ripper
Description:
-Eastmancolor Horror-
Directed by Joe Gayton
Produced by Jonathan Craven, Wes Craven, Peter Sheperd
Time: 1995 10 8 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
From Dusk till Dawn
Description:
-Eastmancolor Comedy Action Horror-
Directed by Robert Rodriguez
Produced by Gianni Nunnari, Meir Teper
Time: 1996 1 19 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Hellraiser: Bloodline
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Science Fiction Body Horror-
Directed by Kevin Yagher, Joe Chappelle Produced by Nancy Rae Stone
Time: 1996 3 8 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Scream
Description:
-Eastmancolor Satirical Slasher Horror-
Directed by Wes Craven
Produced by Cathy Konrad, Cary Woods
Time: 1996 12 20 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Leprechaun 4: In Space
Description:
-Eastmancolor Science Fiction Comedy Slasher Horror-
Directed by Brian Trenchard-Smith
Produced by Jeff Geoffray, Walter Josten
Time: 1997 2 25 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Kim Henkel
Produced by Robert Kuhn, Kim Henkel
Time: 1997 8 29
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
I Know What You Did Last Summer
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Jim Gillespie
Produced by Neal H. Mortiz, Erik Feig, Stokely Chaffin
Time: 1997 10 17 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Alien Resurrection
Description:
-Eastmancolor Science Fiction Action Monster Horror-
Directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet
Produced by Gordon Carroll, David Giler, Walter Hill
Time: 1997 11 26 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Scream 2
Description:
-Eastmancolor Satirical Slasher Horror-
Directed by Wes Craven
Produced by Wes Craven, Cathy Konrad, Marianne Maddalena
Time: 1997 12 10 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Katasumi and 4444444444
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Takashi Shimizu
Produced by Yasuyuki Uemura
Time: 1998 1 1 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Ring
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Hideo Nakata
Produced by Shinya Kawai, Takenori Sento
Time: 1998 1 31 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Rasen
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Horror-
Directed by George Iida
Produced by Takashige Ichise, Shinya Kawai, Takenori Sento
Time: 1998 1 31 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Last Broadcast
Description:
-Eastmancolor Found Footage Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Stefan Avalos
Lance Weiler
Produced by Stefan Avalos
Lance Weiler
Popularized the found footage subgenre
Masterfully utilized the idea of the film being "real"
Time: 1998 3 9 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Halloween H20: 20 Years Later
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Steve Miner
Produced by Paul Freeman
Time: 1998 8 5 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Urban Legend
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Jamie Blanks
Produced by Gina Matthews, Michael McDonnell, Neal H. Moritz
Time: 1998 9 25 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Bride of Chucky
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Comedy Slasher Horror-
Directed by Ronny Yu
Produced by David Kirschner, Grace Gilroy
Time: 1998 10 16 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Digital Light Processing
Description:
Digital technology is used to distribute motion pictures
Time: 1998 10 23
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
I Still Know What You Did Last Summer
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Danny Cannon
Produced by Neal H. Moritz, Erik Feig, Stokely Chaffin, William S. Beasley
Time: 1998 11 13 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Psycho (1998)
Description:
-Eastmancolor Psychological Slasher Horror-
Directed by Gus Van Sant
Produced by Gus Van Sant, Brian Grazer
Time: 1998 12 4 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Ring 2
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Hideo Nakata
Produced by Takashige Ichise, Shin Ishihara
Time: 1999 1 23 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Blair Witch Project
Description:
-Eastmancolor Found Footage Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Daniel Myrick, Eduardo Sánchez
Produced by Robin Cowie, Gregg Hale
Popularized independent film creators
Time: 1999 1 25 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
From Dusk Till Dawn 2: Texas Blood Money
Description:
-Digital Comedy Action Horror-
Directed by Scott Spiegel
Produced by Michael S. Murphey, Gianni Nunnari, Meir Teper
Time: 1999 3 16 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Sixth Sense
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Horror-
Directed by M. Night Shyamalan
Produced by Frank Marshall, Kathleen Kennedy, Barry Mendel
Highest grossing horror film of the 20th century
Time: 1999 8 2 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
From Dusk Till Dawn 3: The Hangman's Daughter
Description:
-Eastmancolor Comedy Action Horror-
Directed by P. J. Pesce
Produced by Michael S. Murphey, Gianni Nunnari, Meir Teper
Time: 1999 10 31 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Ring 0: Birthday
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Norio Tsuruta
Produced by Shinji Ogawa, Masao Nagai, Takasige Ichise
Time: 2000 1 22 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Scream 3
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Wes Craven
Produced by Cathy Konrad, Kevin Williamson, Marianne Maddalena
Time: 2000 2 3 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Ju-On: The Curse
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Takashi Shimizu
Produced by Takashige Ichise, Kazuo Katō, Masaaki Takashima
Time: 2000 2 11 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Ju-On: The Curse 2
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Takashi Shimizu
Produced by Takashige Ichise, Kazuo Katô, Masaaki Takashima
Time: 2000 3 25 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Leprechaun in the Hood
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Slasher Horror Comedy-
Directed by Rob Spera
Produced by Bruce David Eisen, Mike Upton, Darin Spillman
Time: 2000 3 28 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Urban Legends: Final Cut
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by John Ottman
Produced by Gina Matthews, Neal H. Moritz, Richard Luke Rothschild
Time: 2000 9 22 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Hellraiser: Inferno
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Body Horror-
Directed by Scott Derrickson
Produced by W.K. Border, Joel Soisson
Time: 2000 10 3 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Valentine
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Jamie Blanks
Produced by Dylan Sellers
Time: 2001 2 2 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Jason X
Description:
-Digital Science Fiction Slasher Horror-
Directed by James Isaac
Produced by Noel Cunningham, Sean S. Cunningham, James Isaac
Time: 2002 4 26 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Bubba Ho-Tep
Description:
-Eastmancolor Comedy Horror-
Directed by Don Coscarelli
Produced by Don Coscarelli, Jason R. Savage
Time: 2002 6 9 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Halloween: Resurrection
Description:
-Eastmancolor Slasher Horror-
Directed by Rick Rosenthal
Produced by Paul Freeman
Time: 2002 7 12 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Hellraiser: Hellseeker
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Body Horror-
Directed by Rick Bota
Produced by Michael Leahy, Rob Schmidt
Time: 2002 10 15 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Ring
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Gore Verbinski
Produced by Walter F. Parkes, Laurie MacDonald
Time: 2002 10 18 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Ju-On: The Grudge
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Horror-
Time: 2002 10 18 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
28 Days Later
Description:
-Eastmancolor Zombie Horror-
Directed by Danny Boyle
Produced by Andrew Macdonald
Revitalized the zombie subgenre
Time: 2002 11 1 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Into the Mirror
Description:
-Eastmancolor Mystery Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Kim Sung-ho
Produced by Kim Eun-young
Time: 2003 8 14 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Freddy vs. Jason
Description:
-Digital Crossover Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Ronny Yu
Produced by Sean S. Cunningham
Time: 2003 8 15 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Ju-On: The Grudge 2
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Takashi Shimizu
Produced by Shin'ya Egawa, Takashige Ichise, Kunio Kawakami, Yoshinori Kumazawa, Haruhiko Matsushita, Hiroki Numata
Time: 2003 8 23 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003)
Description:
-Digital Slasher Horror-
Directed by Marcus Nispel
Produced by Michael Bay, Mike Fleiss, Brad Fuller, Kim Henkel, Tobe Hooper
Time: 2003 10 17
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Leprechaun: Back 2 tha' Hood
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Slasher Horror Comedy-
Directed by Steven Ayromlooi
Produced by Mike Upton
Time: 2003 12 30 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Grudge
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Takashi Shimizu
Produced by Sam Raimi, Robert Tapert, Takashige Ichise
Time: 2004 10 22 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Seed of Chucky
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Comedy Slasher Horror-
Directed by Don Mancini
Produced by David Kirschner, Corey Sienega
Time: 2004 11 24 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Ring Two
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Hideo Nakata
Produced by Walter F. Parkes, Laurie MacDonald
Time: 2005 3 18 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
House of Wax (2005)
Description:
-Eastmancolor Mystery Horror-
Directed by Jaume Collet-Serra
Produced by Joel Silver, Robert Zemeckis, Susan Levin
Time: 2005 4 30 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Paul Schrader
Produced by James G. Robinson
Time: 2005 5 20 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Land of the Dead
Description:
-Digital Zombie Horror-
Directed by George A. Romero
Produced by Mark Canton, Bernie Goldmann, Peter Grunwald
Time: 2005 6 18 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Hellraiser: Deader
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Body Horror-
Directed by Rick Bota
Produced by David S. Greathouse, Rob Schmidt, Stan Winston
Time: 2005 7 7 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Urban Legends: Bloody Mary
Description:
-Eastmancolor Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Mary Lambert
Produced by Aaron Merrell, Louis Phillips, Scott Messer
Time: 2005 7 19 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Exorcist: The Beginning
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Renny Harlin
Produced by James G. Robinson
Time: 2005 8 20 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Hellraiser: Hellworld
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Body Horror-
Directed by Rick Bota
Produced by Rob Schmidt
Time: 2005 9 6 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Hills Have Eyes (2006)
Description:
-Digital Horror-
Directed by Alexandre Aja
Produced by Wes Craven, Peter Locke, Marianne Maddalena, Cody Zwieg
Time: 2006 3 10 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
I'll Always Know What You Did Last Summer
Description:
-Digital Slasher Horror-
Directed by Sylvain White
Produced by Neal H. Moritz, Erik Feig
Time: 2006 8 15 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning
Description:
-Digital Slasher Horror-
Directed by Jonathan Liebesman
Produced by Michael Bay, Mike Fleiss, Andrew Form, Brad Fuller, Tobe Hooper, Kim Henkel
Time: 2006 10 6
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Grudge 2
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Takashi Shimizu
Produced by Sam Raimi, Robert Tapert, Takashige Ichise
Time: 2006 10 13 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Hills Have Eyes 2
Description:
-Digital Horror-
Directed by Martin Weisz
Produced by Wes Craven, Johnathan Debin, Peter Locke
Time: 2007 3 23 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Planet Terror
Description:
-Digital Zombie Horror-
Directed by Robert Rodriguez
Produced by Elizabeth Avellán, Robert Rodriguez, Quentin Tarantino
Time: 2007 4 6 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Death Proof
Description:
-Digital Shocksploitation Action Horror-
Directed by Quentin Tarantino
Produced by Quentin Tarantino, Robert Rodriguez, Elizabeth Avellán, Erica Steinberg
Time: 2007 5 27
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Halloween (2007)
Description:
-Digital Shocksploitation Slasher Horror-
Directed by Rob Zombie
Produced by Malek Akkad, Andy Gould, Rob Zombie
Time: 2007 8 31 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Zombie Town
Description:
-Science Fiction Zombie Horror Comedy-
Directed by Damon Lemay
Produced by Damon Lemay
Time: 2007 11 20
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Mirrors
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Alexandre Aja
Produced by Alexandre Aja, Grégory Levasseur
Time: 2008 8 15 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Friday the 13th (2009)
Description:
-Digital Slasher Horror-
Directed by Marcus Nispel
Produced by Michael Bay, Andrew Form, Brad Fuller
Time: 2009 2 13 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Last House on the Left (2009)
Description:
-Digital Shocksploitation Revenge Horror-
Directed by Dennis Iliadis
Produced by Wes Craven, Sean S. Cunningham
Time: 2009 3 13
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Grudge 3
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Toby Wilkins
Produced by Andrew Pfeffer, Takashige Ichise
Time: 2009 5 12 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Ju-On: Black Ghost
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Mari Asato
Produced by Mari Asato
Time: 2009 6 27 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Ju-On: White Ghost
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Ryuta Miyake
Produced by Ryuta Miyake
Time: 2009 6 27 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Halloween II (2009)
Description:
-Digital Slasher Horror-
Directed by Rob Zombie
Produced by Malek Akkad, Andy Gould, Rob Zombie
Time: 2009 8 28 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Human Centipede [First Sequence]
Description:
-Digital Shocksploitation Body Horror-
Directed by Tom Six
Produced by Tom Six, Ilona Six
Time: 2009 8 30 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
A Nightmare on Elm Street (2010)
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Samuel Bayer
Produced by Michael Bay, Andrew Form, Brad Fuller
Time: 2010 4 27 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
A Serbian Film
Description:
-Digital Shocksploitation Horror-
Directed by Srđan Spasojević
Produced by Srđan Spasojević, Dragoljub Vojnov
Highly controversial because of its depictions of rape, necrophilia, and child sexual abuse
Time: 2010 6 11 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
I Spit on Your Grave (2010)
Description:
-Digital Shocksploitation Revenge Horror-
Directed by Steven R. Monroe
Produced by Lisa M. Hansen, Paul Hertzberg
Time: 2010 10 8
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Mirrors 2
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Víctor García
Produced by Betsy Danbury, John Portnoy, Nick Thurlow, Todd Williams
Time: 2010 10 19 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Hellraiser: Revelations
Description:
-Digital Found Footage Supernatural Body Horror-
Directed by Víctor García
Produced by Aaron Ockman, Joel Soisson
Time: 2011 3 18 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Scream 4
Description:
-Digital Slasher Horror-
Directed by Wes Craven
Produced by Wes Craven, Iya Labunka, Kevin Williamson
Time: 2011 4 11 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Human Centipede 2 [Full Sequence]
Description:
-Black and White Shocksploitation Body Horror-
Directed by Tom Six
Produced by Tom Six, Ilona Six
Time: 2011 9 22 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Sadako 3D
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Tsutomu Hanabusa
Produced by Atsuyuki Shimoda
Time: 2012 5 12 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Prometheus
Description:
-Digital Science Fiction Monster Horror-
Directed by Ridley Scott
Produced by Ridley Scott, David Giler, Walter Hill
Time: 2012 12 28
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Texas Chainsaw 3D
Description:
-Digital 3D Slasher Horror-
Directed by John Luessenhop
Produced by Carl Mazzocone
Time: 2013 1 4
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Evil Dead (2013)
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Fede Álvarez
Produced by Bruce Campbell, Robert Tapert, Sam Raimi
Time: 2013 3 8 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Sadako 3D 2
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Tsutomu Hanabusa
Screenplay by Daisuke Hosaka, Noriaki Sugihara
Time: 2013 8 30 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
I Spit on Your Grave 2
Description:
-Digital Shocksploitation Revenge Horror-
Directed by Steven R. Monroe
Produced by Lisa M. Hansen, Paul Hertzberg
Time: 2013 9 20
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Curse of Chucky
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Don Mancini
Produced by David Kirschner
Time: 2013 9 24 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Ju-On: The Beginning of the End
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Masayuki Ochiai
Produced by Takashige Ichinose
Time: 2014 6 28 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Leprechaun: Origins
Description:
-Digital Monster Horror-
Directed by Zach Lipovsky
Produced by Chris Foss, Michael Luisi
Time: 2014 8 22 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
The Human Centipede 3 [Final Sequence]
Description:
-Digital Satirical Shocksploitation Body Horror-
Directed by Tom Six
Produced by Tom Six, Ilona Six
Time: 2015 5 22 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Ju-On: The Final Curse
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Masayuki Ochiai
Produced by Takashige Ichise
Time: 2015 6 20 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
I Spit on Your Grave III: Vengeance is Mine
Description:
-Digital Shocksploitation Revenge Horror-
Directed by R.D. Braunstein
Produced by Lisa M. Hansen, Paul Hertzberg
Time: 2015 10 20
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Sadako vs. Kayako
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Crossover Horror-
Directed by Kōji Shiraishi
Written by Kōji Shiraishi
Time: 2016 6 18 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Blaire Witch
Description:
-Digital Found Footage Supernatural Horror-
Directed by Adam Wingard
Produced by Keith Calder, Roy Lee, Steven Schneider, Jessica Wu
Time: 2016 9 11 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Rings
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Horror-
Directed by F. Javier Gutiérrez
Produced by Laurie MacDonald, Walter F. Parkes
Time: 2017 2 3 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Alien: Covenant
Description:
-Digital Science Fiction Monster Horror-
Directed by Ridley Scott
Produced by David Giler, Walter Hill, Ridley Scott, Mark Huffam, Michael Schaefer
Time: 2017 5 4 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Cult of Chucky
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Slasher Horror-
Directed by Don Mancini
Produced by David Kirschner, Ogden Gavanski
Time: 2017 8 34 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Leatherface
Description:
-Digital Slasher Horror-
Directed by Julien Maury, Alexandre Bustillo
Produced by Christa Campbell, Lati Grobman, Carl Mazzocone, Les Weldon
Time: 2017 10 20
TagCsv:

Type: Event
Name:
Hellraiser: Judgement
Description:
-Digital Supernatural Body Horror-
Directed by Gary J. Tunnicliffe
Produced by Michael Leahy
Time: 2018 2 18 0 0
TagCsv:

 

Type: Period
Name:
Classic Horror
Description:
Films created during this period are deemed classic
Time from: 1886 5 27
Time to: 1989 1 1
TagCsv:

Type: Period
Name:
Silent Age
Description:
A period of time where films were without sound synchronization due to technical restrictions
Time from: 1891 1 1
Time to: 1927 10 6
TagCsv:

Type: Period
Name:
German Expressionism Era
Description:
During WWI, the German Expressionist art style was popular in films
Time from: 1915 1 1
Time to: 1929 12 31
TagCsv:

Type: Period
Name:
Universal Era
Description:
A period of time where an American company, Universal Films, dominated the horror scene by adapting famous horror novels into cinema
Time from: 1930 1 1
Time to: 1955 12 31
TagCsv:

Type: Period
Name:
Golden Age
Description:
The beginning of "Talkies", movies with sound, and when horror became a genre in film
Time from: 1930 1 1
Time to: 1949 1 1
TagCsv:

Type: Period
Name:
"B" Movie Era
Description:
Following WWII, American audiences became more interested in films concerning giant monsters and alien invaders
Filmmakers oftentimes used cheap methods of production to achieve such effects
Time from: 1950 1 1
Time to: 1959 12 31
TagCsv:

Type: Period
Name:
Silver Age
Description:
A period of time where horror films shifted towards Science Fiction
Time from: 1950 1 1
Time to: 1969 1 1
TagCsv:

Type: Period
Name:
Hammer Era
Description:
A period of time where a British company, Hammer Films, dominated the horror scene with gothic thrillers
Time from: 1960 1 1
Time to: 1969 12 31
TagCsv:

Type: Period
Name:
Bronze Age
Description:
A period of time where gore is increased and ground breaking horror films are produced
Time from: 1970 1 1
Time to: 1989 1 1
TagCsv:

Type: Period
Name:
Shocksploitation Era
Description:
Filmmakers began exploring taboo and otherwise sensitive subjects to bring in audiences
Time from: 1970 1 1
Time to: 1979 12 31
TagCsv:

Type: Period
Name:
Slasher Era
Description:
Filmmakers began focusing on one central murderer that amasses a large body count in their films
Time from: 1978 1 1 0 0
Time to: 1989 1 1 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Period
Name:
Digital Age
Description:
Films are produced in higher quality due to advancing technology
Time from: 1990 1 1
Time to: 2020 1 1
TagCsv:

Type: Period
Name:
Modern Horror
Description:
The horror films of the present day
Time from: 1990 1 1
Time to: 2020 8 3
TagCsv:

Type: Period
Name:
Found Footage Era
Time from: 1998 1 1 0 0
Time to: 2010 1 1 0 0
TagCsv:

Type: Period
Name:
Haunting Era
Description:
Filmmakers took an interest in ghost/ demon centric films that focused on one primary haunting location
Time from: 2007 1 1 0 0
Time to: 2016 1 1 0 0
TagCsv:

 

 

 

 

history of horror movies

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I get this question all the time what
are your favourite slasher movies I'm
gonna tell you what my favourite slasher
movies are what's up guys welcome to
another drum dumps top ten I always love
doing top tens
you guys handle like them too this is
the slasher movie book this book is
really expensive now it's not a print
but I figured since I'm talking about
slashers I'd show you this book it's uh
it's it's by Jay Akers well mine still
looks like it's in great condition I've
had it for probably like five years now
and but yeah I mean if let me let me
show you like if you look there you can
see all the slashers that are talked
about in this book it's just insane so
if you guys can ever get lucky enough to
find this thing anywhere be sure oh
there's Halloween right there hold on oh
there's the burning yeah the burning so
yeah if you guys can ever find the
slasher movie book be sure to find it a
few of my subscribers have actually
bought this because I talked about it in
previous videos so I'm gonna put that up
now but here we go
this is gonna be a lot of fun now first
off this is my list it's not your list
and I haven't seen every slasher I mean
if you look through that book there are
literally hundreds of slasher movies so
I haven't seen them all so I know I'm
gonna miss some like the Prowler I've
never seen the Prowler I want to I
really want to but I haven't seen it yet
so also before I get into this you see
I'm wearing a certain slasher
shirt right here this is Michael Myers
this is the ER Michael Myers t-shirt
from killer flicks my facebook group we
have this shirt designed we Bolin
designed it and if you want one you can
actually get it at the gumgum store I'll
post a link right here and there'll be a
link in the info box now on to the
countdown now first off I'm gonna give
you two quick honorable mentions just
because I had to mention these two
movies the first honorable mention is
Halloween for Halloween four is a movie
that made me obsessed with the Halloween
franchise it's the movie that really
scared the crap out of me it's one of
the few movies you know
cuz horror fans we don't really get
scared that often we just like to rush
but Halloween 4 is one of the few that
literally just like ship my foundations
and so I had to mention it that movie is
just insane and obviously because the
original Halloween might be on this list
but the ending of Halloween 4 is like
one of the creepiest endings I've ever
seen and most shocking like I did not
expect that
and my next honorable mention is gonna
be My Bloody Valentine and this movie's
great it just didn't make my top 10 but
you know after Halloween every holiday
was not safe they had to make a slasher
movie out of whatever holiday was was
around and my buddy Valentine is one of
the better ones actually because it's
kind of a blue-collar slasher at setting
in like a mining town and I love the
look of the the killer with the gas
masks okay so here we go number 10 is
gonna be psycho the original psycho is
probably the most influential slasher
movie ever and I do have a few classics
on here that like are back in that era
and this one is definitely one of the
most popular and what's fun is I didn't
even see cycle until after I saw cycle 2
and when I went back and watched psycho
I loved it if Norman Bates is one of the
greatest and most interesting characters
ever put to screen and he's a big reason
why cycle works so well and Alfred
Hitchcock is it needs a bigger reason
why the movie works so well because his
directing in that and the the iconic
shower scene that's still like so
effective this day like a lot of people
are afraid to take showers because of
psycho number 9 is gonna be a Friday the
13th movie Friday the 13th part 4 this
is tough because there's there's a few
really good Friday movies but I think
out of all of them part 4 I think gets
it right on every single love this movie
is like the perfect slasher movie this
is when Jason was that his most lethal
and scary and Ted White was such a great
Jason and that final act for Chris and
Tommy Jarvis and the machete going in to
Jason's head oh I just love this movie
so much
most Friday movies are like a b-movie
but I think Friday part 4 is like an a
movie
in in the Christmas table or dance
number eight is going to be a Nightmare
on Elm Street
now this one probably should be higher
on the list it's just there's so many
great phenomenal slashes out there that
it was really hard for me arranged a and
don't take the the number in this list
like to heart because most of these
movies I love all the same but 9 1 o
Street definitely deserves to be in my
top 10 Freddy Krueger is one of the big
three and he's one of the big three
before a great reason he's so
interesting and everybody can relate to
going to sleep and having nightmares and
why not capitalize on that and Robert
Englund plays Freddy to perfection and
you know I think that's a big reason why
the remake didn't do so well even though
I do like that movie I think to try to
copy what Robert Englund did even if you
do a different version of the character
like Jackie Riley did you're setting
yourself up for failure because he he
nailed it he was perfect and I love
Heather Langenkamp in this role at the
end when they're doing the the booby
traps really haul home copies and I'm on
toast rate if you think about it just
such a fun ride number 7 is going to be
black Christmas black Christmas really
is one of the first that started the
slasher craze as we know it today but it
wasn't really like Halloween was really
the one that like kicked the doors open
but black Christmas was very similar to
Halloween as far as a template goes and
I don't think it got it to come up and
until you know in the 2000s everybody
just started talking about Black
Christmas again and it's just a
beautifully done movie by Bob Clark I
think Billy is one of the most
interesting slasher characters ever put
the screen because you don't really know
much about him at all you don't even see
him at all all you see is like his eye
and the Christmas music is so creepy in
this movie and I think it just works so
well because it's so cold - like the
whole movie feels like it's just a dead
of winter and you know I love wintery
horror movies so Black Christmas is from
and it had to make the list number six
is a movie that I recently just reviewed
matter of fact it was my last review I
think and it's a movie that I had never
seen before
it's called Bay of blood directed by
Mario Bava also known as twitch of the
Deaf nerve this movie immediately
captivated me because of the kills the
kills are just so brutal and this movie
was made in 1971 and you really don't
care about all the twists and turns that
happens in it you really just love the
kills I love the way that Mario Bava
directs this thing how there's a lot of
camera zoom in and zoom out but the one
scene especially is when the the girl is
running from the bay and he hooks her
with the billhook
and like rips her neck part and it's
just brutal but yeah if you haven't seen
Bay of blood do yourself a favor
definitely check it out it's worth
buying it's it's great and it's one of
the first slashers as we know them today
number 5 is gonna be scream how could
you not put screens on this list the
movie alone revitalized the slasher
genre the genre was all but dead and
then screen comes along and just
breathes new life into it and it pays
homage to the slasher movies before it
especially Halloween actually but
Ghostface was such an interesting killer
because he could be anybody
and you have this really fresh of hip
cast throughout the whole thing and it's
one of the few movies like set in like
the 90s and 2000's that I think works
like flawlessly because a lot of times
especially in the cellphone age I think
that's a big reason why the the slasher
movies don't work as well and this one
did have cellphones in it but it's one
of the few that really gets it right
because the cellphones actually have a
purpose in the movie number four is
another jell-o film Tenebrae and this is
a movie that I recently discovered in
the last year a big shout out to dylan
clancy for recommending this one to me
but Tenebrae just the visual style of
this movie just knock my socks off Dario
gent Argento immediately jumped into the
mic like my top three favorite horror
actor
and it was so refreshing because even
though this movie was made in like the
early 80s I've never seen any slasher
like it before and it made me want to
research more of his movies and I
watched Suspiria after but tenebrae the
music the score in this movie is so well
done the directing is so well done
everything is just beautiful and I think
one of my favorite scenes is when the
girl is run from the dog just because of
how realistic it looked and and how you
know she really looked like she was in
danger in that scene so another one that
I highly recommend tenebrae number three
is gonna be a camp slasher the burning
the number one reason why this burning
is in my top three is because it has one
of the most gruesome kills I've ever
seen on screen in a slasher movie and
that is the rap scene Tom Savini the
work he did on that scene is like
exactly what you would want in a kill
scene in a slasher movie it doesn't hold
back at all and it looks real and it's
just a blood fest so that scene alone
gets this gets this movie in my top
three and cropsy is an interesting
killer I actually said in my review that
I wasn't like completely captivated by
cropsy but it's one of those movies that
stays with you and now I love crops he
has a killer and I'm surprised they
never made a sequel to the burning
number two is gonna be live away camp I
just literally right before this
reviewed or re-reviewed sleepaway camp
and sleepaway camp gets in my top two
because of how unique it is and how like
awkward and wrong it feels and of course
that ending that ending is like the
greatest or ending I think I've ever
seen put the screen because of how
shocking it is and I love that the
characters in this movie were just kids
they really were kids and yet they were
saying these like horrible things and
then you had this relationship between
like a teenager and a freaking 70 year
old guy all this stuff that just came
together to make the perfect slasher
movie and the most unique and original
slasher movies I've ever seen
so yeah sleepaway camp and number one no
surprise here John Carpenter's Halloween
Wow what else can I say about holding up
there's even a big price I'll talk to it
ad nauseum a million times you know why
it's great Halloween 2018 is coming out
this year but to be blunt about it John
Carpenter the killer Michael Myers the
perfect final girl Jamie Lee Curtis I
mean it's this is the perfect storm of
slasher movies it's everything coming
together to make the perfect horror
movie that's what Halloween is it gets
more and more popular every single year
we will never stop talking about
Halloween I am predicting that this new
movie is going to like make in the first
week more than any other Halloween movie
has ever made just because of how
popular the franchise is and how it
keeps growing even on killer flicks it's
the number one thing people talk about
is Halloween and then the other thing
people talk about is how they're sick of
talking about Halloween so anyway that's
it that's my top 10 favorite slasher
movies of all time I'm sure I probably
forgot a couple that I had I have seen
so post your favorites down in the
comments below let me know what you
liked also come over the killer flicks
where we talk for all day and on Fridays
review free fall Fridays if you like
what I'm doing hit that subscribe button
I'd really appreciate it follow me at
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letterbox and now Stardust anyway guys
thank you so much for watching have a
great day and roam them out

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how in seven hells have i never seen
funny games let's review this freaking
funny game stars naomi watts michael
pitt tim roth and is directed by
michael haneke what is up guys welcome
to another horror review i guess this is
a catalog title funny games this is a
movie that came out
uh in 2007 and i have to give a
big big shout out to carly hart she
actually sent me
the 2007 version starring naomi watts
i've always seen this cover and i've
always been curious about this movie
and then she also sent me the the 1997
criterion edition the original version
and from what
i've heard uh both movies are pretty
much the same like this is a shot for
shot remake of this movie
but uh i'm still looking forward to
watching this one but i definitely
wanted to watch this one first because
uh not just not because it's an american
version but because i'm a big fan of
michael pitt and naomi watts i think
michael pitt is a highly highly
underrated actor actually but first off
quick plot synopsis
uh this is the story of this family they
are a wealthy family and they go
on a vacation getaway it's like this
lake
house resort type area right at the
beginning of the movie
uh you know naomi watts she plays anne
and then all of a sudden she's
approached by this guy peter this really
young kid
you know they're wearing like a tennis
get up
him and his brother paul uh enter the
house
and of course they don't look like a
threat and that's one thing i really
enjoy about this movie too
is what if the threat is somebody that
you don't think is a threat at all
you know it's not the guy in the in the
hockey mask or something like that
it's just this young guy that wants to
borrow some eggs
and that's pretty much what this is and
it's not
an abrupt type thing either it's
something that kind of
gradually eases in it's not like there's
a moment where she's like oh my god
we have to we have to save ourselves
here we're no she starts off being very
friendly
and then it just eases into an awkward
situation
and then i think it's like five minutes
down the line she's like
okay we're in trouble here now this this
situation
there's something off about this and so
then her husband comes in played by
tim roth let me just jump cut to the
chase tim roth
the husband is pretty much worthless
throughout this whole movie and it's
intentional there's a reason why
because imagine if you're a guy
and you're in a situation like this and
all of us guys you know we think we're
tough guys
but if you really think about it you're
in a situation like this
and you have to think about 10 different
variables
different outcomes that could happen you
know i'm putting on my dr strange brain
here
and when your kid is right there in the
killer's hands
you know and he can easily kill your kid
just like that
and your leg is broken what are you
gonna do
um i felt bad for the dad in this
because
i think he himself thought that
i'm the father i'm the man of the house
i can take care of the situation
and then there's this moment in the
movie where
he realizes that he can't and you know
he sees all this stuff going on around
him
and then he literally tells his wife
forgive me
you know it was a very heartfelt moment
in the movie very sad
moment in the movie but really what this
movie is
it's a one location environment type of
film
it is a home invasion movie i think
uh told in a very unique fashion and it
is
probably one of the most intense home
invasion movies i've seen and i'd say
the strangers
is another great example of a highly
intense type of movie but it's a it's a
completely
different set of circumstances a
different threat
just because the killers and the
strangers you know they that you know
exactly what they are
they have masks on from the second you
see them you know
there's danger here these are different
you know this is like i said these are
young boys and i was kind of getting
eaten leg vibes even though these aren't
children i mean they're they're like
late teens maybe even early 20s
or at least paul that's one thing i
really loved about this you're caught by
surprise
that these young people could do
something this heinous this crazy
for whatever reason because there really
is no reason this
these are really diet in the wool
sociopaths
they're very uh seductive manipulative
and you know they're patient they like
the game
aspect of this you know that's what this
is for them
it's a game now let's talk about the
acting in this movie because oh my god
the the acting in this movie is some of
the finest acting i've ever seen
in a movie let alone it being a horror
movie um
and i think part of that too is uh
michael hanecki's direction there's a
lot of scenes in this where he just lets
the camera sit there
and you see like a lot of depth of field
in the frame
and so you'll see like one subject like
ann
uh in the front and in the back you see
her husband
and there's all these possibilities that
could happen and
the longer that camera sits there like
that
the the more frantic you get as a
viewer it surprised me that something
that simple
you know and this is really like a john
carpenter type deal too
john carpenter would do this all the
time in his movies just let the camera
sit there
and he was just very smart about set
dressing
makes making sure that there's a lot of
openness in the frame in certain
sections
and the possibilities you know anything
can happen
this film does it probably the best i've
seen
in you know the last 20 years economy of
scare
that's what this movie is you know it
doesn't rely
on like jump scares no it's not that
type of horror film at all
it's brilliant actually but jumping over
to the acting
there's a section in the movie where
anne she you know her husband
tells her to take off her clothes that's
the control
that these two young boys especially
paul played by michael pitt
have over this couple he doesn't tell
her to take off her clothes
he makes her husband tell her to take
off her clothes so then there's this one
scene where the camera is like behind
the couch
and you see naomi watch uh sitting like
in a crouching position
and she has to stand up as an actress
what she was able to pull off
in that scene because just think about
it this scene looks like it goes on for
a good
five minutes and if if
the actor uh breaks character for even a
second you have to stop and completely
do it all over again
the way naomi watts and tim roth and
even the child
in this movie were able to just really
dig into these characters
be in the moment that's got to be the
coolest thing for an actor to be able to
go that far
into a character so far that they feel
like they are the character
there's scenes where like naomi watts is
crying in this movie and
we've all seen those fake tears you know
where they they squirt the water
droplets in their eyes but i mean this
was just real this was
anguish this was pain there was so many
different emotions
on her face as she was crying throughout
this movie
now michael pitt i have to stress how
effective this was as an actor this was
an actor that was in complete
control of the character throughout the
entire
movie and one thing i loved about this
too was that this
character didn't just toy with
the the prey he toyed with you
he toyed with the audience and that was
a nice little surprise there's that
scene
where he has them sitting on the couch
and this is
a good like 30 minutes into the movie at
least he's such a coward
and all of a sudden he just like looks
at the camera for a sec
and he talks to the audience like he's
talking
to the characters he tells the audience
you're concerned you want this movie to
end a certain way
well i'm in control you're not in
control
uh my prey are not in control i'm gonna
decide how this movie ends and i've
never seen a movie do that before
or if i have not this effective and it
carries through the entire movie
but michael pitt's performance like i
i don't use the term oscar-worthy
lightly
and it amazes me that he was passed over
for this role but he wasn't even
nominated for this role because
he was just in complete control if i
could compare to anything i would
compare it to the character don logan
played by ben kingsley
who was nominated for an oscar in sexy
beast
if you haven't seen sexy beast i highly
recommend it if you want a
a chilling performance by a villain
don logan one of the most underrated
villains and i can't believe i didn't
put him on my underrated villains top
ten but sexy beast is not really a
horror movie so maybe that's why
but uh michael pitt jesus christ what a
freaking performance
now for older movies i i usually talk
spoilers but i'll give you guys a
warning right now
from this point on i'm gonna be talking
a little bit of the spoiler talk but
i think you can already tell that i
loved this movie if you don't want to
know what happens at the end of this
movie
you might want to stop watching but the
end of this movie i remember after it
ended i was just like
wow like that was an ending like that
was really
crazy to completely discard
the victim in because anne is the last
person standing
uh throughout this movie or i guess
sitting she's sitting on the boat and he
just literally pushes her over and
you're like
wait no no that's not it right she's
gonna get up right because that happens
in
every other uh horror movie that comes
out you know
that one last ditch effort from the uh
the protagonist
but no he pushes her over just
completely discards her
goes to the next house and then you know
looks directly at the camera and smiles
at the audience
like basically giving the audience a big
you know fuck you
at first i was angry because i was
really so invested in
anne as a character i wanted her to
succeed
so bad and when she did it
i realized i didn't get my way
and this was the intention of the movie
the whole way through but you're so
invested in what's going on
that you don't think like there's even
the one scene with the remote control
where
uh anne picks up the gun and she shoots
peter
and then paul picks up the remote
control hits the rewind button and the
movie rewinds itself
i've never seen a movie do that before
that's really crazy
and at first you're like that that took
me out of the movie you can't do that
you can't just change
the script in the middle of the movie
but
if you think back to the first time that
he looks at the camera
as soon as he did that it was in play
you know so you had to go along with it
and this was a killer that was in
complete
control but i could see how a lot of
people would feel
let down by that especially that scene
with the remote control but
after taking it all in i i thought it
was genius
you know like i said this is a director
who told a story that he wanted to tell
and he wanted the killer to have
complete control throughout the entire
run
and why not you know there's a million
different
horror stories out there why can't this
one exist
and and it's i i loved it i thought it
was just completely genius
i thought this was one of the most
refreshing home invasion films i've ever
seen
uh the performances alone get this movie
a four out of five
uh you know michael pitt naomi watts
even tim roth i mean all the
performances are just amazing in this
movie
it's trapped in the mouse that's point
thank you so much for sending this movie
to me i'm looking forward to watching
the the original
even though i know it's pretty much the
same movie i hear
tonally it's a little bit even more
harsh if that's even possible
but wow wow what a movie so anyway guys
in the comments let me know what you
guys thought
of funny games uh looking forward to
hearing them if you haven't seen this
movie
highly highly recommend you adding this
to your collection
also be sure to come over to or flex or
talk whore all day and every day on
fridays will be free for our fridays
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thank you so much for wat

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